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10 photos that blew the competition away at the Siena International Photo Awards.

These images captures something astounding, magical, true, or important about the world.

These images are basically like downloading a National Geographic magazine straight to your brain.

Every year, the Siena International Photo Awards brings together some of the world's most amazing photographers. Their mission? Use the power of the photograph to encourage a greater understanding of the world’s places, populations, and people.

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Slideshows

Fact: NASA takes the best before-and-after photos. Here are 10 of them.

They provide a new perspective of the events that have changed the Earth.

NASA satellites continually monitor the Earth, snapping photos and sending information to researchers on the ground.

Most of the time, things seem to be more or less the same as they were the day before, but the Earth is constantly changing. Sometimes it changes through discrete events, like landslides and floods. Other times, long-term trends, such as climate change, slowly reshape the land in ways that are difficult to see.

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Slideshows

This Brain ‘Pacemaker’ Stops Parkinson’s Tremors In Seconds. Now Research Suggests It Could Improve Thinking Too.

Neurosurgeons think the device could one day help patients regain skills like problem-solving and multitasking.

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. outside the United States Supreme Court in 2012. Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Just before Thanksgiving, Reverend Jesse Jackson announced to his supporters that he’d been suffering from Parkinson’s disease for about three years, joining the ranks of other public figures with the condition, like actor Michael J. Fox and boxer Muhammed Ali, who died after a lengthy battle with Parkinson’s last year. The announcement from another famous face has renewed conversations around the afflication, which affects up to 10 million people worldwide. But researchers have been seeking ways to ease symptoms for years.

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Articles

Every Fall, Monarch Butterflies Travel An Epic 3,000 Miles — But They're A Little Late This Year

Our weird, warm autumn may be delaying one of nature's greatest migrations.

In case you hadn’t noticed, it’s officially fall: Trees are turning red and orange, giant boxes of pumpkins have appeared outside every grocery store, and households are prepping for visiting relatives. Meanwhile, in the animal world, one of the greatest annual migrations is underway. Far above us, hordes of monarch butterflies are winging it south to Mexico. Or, at least, they’re supposed to be.

Image by Enrique Castro/AFP/Getty Images.

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Spiders Have Super-Hearing Powers — And Scientists Think We Can Steal Them For Ourselves

If Spider-Man were scientifically accurate, he’d be able to detect the faintest sounds in any crowd with ease.

Trying to keep up with a conversation — or simply make out any important noises — in a crowd can be an annoying experience. It may even feel like you’ve got cobwebs in your ears. And for people with decreased hearing, it’s even more frustrating. Thanks to new research, though, real cobwebs could one day help people hear more clearly than ever before.

Spiders generally have pretty bad eyesight, but they do have a unique way to hear the world. Like many creepy-crawlies, they’re covered in tiny super-thin hairs. Especially on their legs. These hairs aren’t just for style though: They can detect changes in the air, along with sound waves.

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Health

Vintage Maps From A Swashbuckling Era Are Leading Scientists To Forgotten Treasure: ‘Ghost’ Reefs

These intricate “Google Maps” for sailors are as tall as a grown man — and are helping today’s marine experts monitor our oceans.

Professor Loren McClenachan of Colby College was visiting the British Admiralty Library in Portsmouth, England, when she unearthed a series of magnificent antique nautical charts. Depicting the waters around the Florida Keys, the charts were made by British cartographers and dated from just before the American Revolution.

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Articles