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Chilean Rapper Ana Tijoux Takes on Capitalism in New Video

Hip-hop has always been a useful vehicle for revolutionary political ideals, and the acclaimed emcee has always deployed it for that purpose

Photo courtesy of Nacional Records

It’s hard to get ahold of Ana Tijoux these days. When she isn’t playing shows in New York and Los Angeles, creating music with Palestinian rapper Shadia Mansour, or penning fiery feminist essays for the Walker Art Center, the 37-year old Chilean MC is back home, spending time with her son and daughter, Luciano and Emilia. When Tijoux released her latest album Vengo earlier this year, her impassioned delivery and highly political lyrics garnered glowing reviews from music critics all over the world. “The music of Vengo is virtually flawless,” declared NPR.

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My Postpartum Blues Don’t Mean I’ve Failed at Motherhood

Want to help mothers dealing with postpartum depression and anxiety? Try listening, not judging.

New moms, especially those suffering postpartum depression and anxiety, can feel like their parenting skills are being scrutinized from every angle.

It’s hard to remember the draining, exuberant emotional fog that rolled in after my son was born. I was exhausted. I was in love. He was huge and always hungry, but my milk supply was low. Or I held him wrong. Or I was a failure.

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Why Are Young Women More Ambitious? They Have to Be

Perhaps guys aren't focused on their futures because they know it usually works out better for them.


The headline of a new study by the Pew Research Center claims to have discovered "A Gender Reversal On Career Aspirations." But upon closer inspection, the study appears to imply that young women are more ambitious than men their age across the board. Sixty-six percent of 18 to 34-year-old women rate their career high on their list of life priorities, compared with 59 percent of young men. This figure hasn't really "reversed," but it has shifted markedly in the past 15 years—in 1997, only 56 percent of young women felt the same way, compared to 58 percent of men.

Today's young women aren't planning to make any sacrifices on the home front, either—they're prioritizing their personal lives, too. The amount of young women who say that having a successful marriage is one of the most important things in their lives has risen nine percentage points since 1997, from 28 to 37 percent. For young men, that stat is trending in the opposite direction—from 35 percent in 1997 to 29 percent now. More young women than men care about being a good parent—59 percent, compared to 47 percent of their male counterparts. It looks like young women are more likely to be thinking consciously about their priorities, period. Do dudes just not give thought to their futures at all?

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