GOOD

These Salvadoran Locals Leave No Trace in Their Mangroves

The mangroves of Guatemala. A beautiful place to visit and explore. But for some people, such as Jorge or Nahun, the mangroves are a way of life.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Anyone remember the carbon cycle from fourth grade science class? During photosynthesis, plants and trees suck in carbon dioxide—keeping it, at least temporarily, out of the atmosphere, and making forests an important part of the fight against climate change. A new study in Science shows that there's an unlikely hero in the process: mushrooms.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Why Historic Buildings Are Greener Than LEED-Certified New Ones

For buildings of comparable size and use, old buildings are almost always the greenest buildings.


Buildings eat up a huge amount of energy—about two-fifths of the country’s total use—so to suppress their appetite for power, efficiency entrepreneurs are churning out a suite of nifty technologies, like automatically shading windows, smarter thermostats, and high-tech heating and cooling systems. But a new report from the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Preservation Green Lab concludes that constructing new, energy-efficient buildings almost never saves as much energy as renovating old ones.

Renovated buildings outperformed new buildings on energy savings in every category: single-family homes, multifamily complexes, commercial offices, “urban village” mixed-use structures, and elementary schools. Though the conclusion may seem counterintuitive in an age of ambitious LEED standards in many new buildings, consider that it uses more energy and creates more impact to construct an entirely new building than to fix up one of the same size for the same purpose. The only exception to the lab’s finding was converting a warehouse to a multi-family dwelling, which required enough extra materials that creating a new building was the greener choice.

The report doesn’t take into account the costs associated with renovations and new construction, but green builders say fixer-uppers are often the more economical choice, too. “It costs less to take an existing building and renovate that to build a new one, at least on the projects I’ve worked on,” says Helen Kessler, a board member of the Illinois chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. She cautions, though, that these comparisons vary from building to building: “There’s always an “it depends” about this."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Trailblazing (and Biking) For Wildlife Preservation The Sonoran Desert Mountain Bicylists Work for Preservation

Reinventing the Outdoors Contest: Learn more about this week's organization, the Sonoran Desert Mountain Bicyclists.

UPDATED! Launched on Monday April 4, GOOD and the 2011 Ford Explorer will be devoting six weeks to the Reinventing the Outdoors Contest, which showcases amazing organizations like this one that are redefining the way we live, work, and play outside. Check in every day for a new story about the people, celebrities, and programs behind each organization. Help your favorite group win the $50,000 grand prize by voting for them starting Monday, May 16 through Friday, May 20.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Cycle of Life: Biking for Land Preservation

Reinventing the Outdoors contest: Sonoran Desert Mountain Bicyclists director Brian Vance talks about how mountain biking should coexist with nature.

UPDATED! Launched on Monday April 4, GOOD and the 2011 Ford Explorer will be devoting six weeks to the Reinventing the Outdoors Contest, which showcases amazing organizations like this one that are redefining the way we live, work, and play outside. Check in every day for a new story about the people, celebrities, and programs behind each organization. Help your favorite group win the $50,000 grand prize by voting for them starting Monday, May 16 through Friday, May 20.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

How You Can Help the Maasai Win $50,000

Reinventing the Outdoors Contest: Learn about the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust

UPDATED! Launched on Monday April 4, GOOD and the 2011 Ford Explorer will be devoting six weeks to the Reinventing the Outdoors Contest, which showcases amazing organizations like this one that are redefining the way we live, work, and play outside. Check in every day for a new story about the people, celebrities, and programs behind each organization. Help your favorite group win the $50,000 grand prize by voting for them starting Monday, May 16 through Friday, May 20.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles