GOOD

Want To Reset Your Brain’s Master Clock? These Scientists Think They Know How

Researchers from Vanderbilt University are shooting light-sensitive cells with lasers in the hopes of a better night’s sleep

image via (cc) flickr user thelotuscarroll

For anyone who’s suffered from lousy sleep cycles, a new study out of Vanderbilt University may contain some good news. A team of researchers have, for the first time, determined that the body’s sleep patterns can be manipulated and its internal clock regulated, on a neurological level. By doing so, the researchers believe they can trick the body into avoiding things like jet lag and even seasonal affective disorder.

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Sleep Study: Apps That Track Your Slumber #30DaysofGOOD

Try one of these apps to measure and analyze your sleep patterns.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFh_oETGmEI

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for May? Sleep better.

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The Most Diabolical Alarm Clock Apps to Get You Out of Bed #30DaysofGOOD

Having trouble waking up? Try these clever apps.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSLKwrToi4Q

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn't agree more. That's why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge (#30DaysofGOOD), a monthly attempt to live better. Our challenge for May? Sleep better.

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Is It Healthier to Scrap Your Alarm Clock?

Andrea James hasn't used an alarm clock in eight years, and she says she feels great. Could you go without that morning buzz?


Hot on the heels of her colleague's revelation that he's decided swear off soap and shampoo for the foreseeable future, the BoingBoing contributor Andrea James has today outed herself as an alarm abstainer. That is, James says she's doesn't use any sort of alarm—clock, watch, or cellphone—to wake herself up. She also claims that, in eight years of rising according to her biological clock, she's not ever overslept or missed a single important appointment.

Sound impossible? Maybe. But James says eschewing an alarm has both forced her to adopt better behavior and improved her health:

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