GOOD

It's easy to become calloused to everyday headlines with messages like, "the world is ending" and "everything is going extinct." They're so prevalent, in fact, that the severity of these statements has completely diminished to the point that no one pays them any attention. This environmental negativity (coined "eco-phobia") has led us to believe that all hope is lost for wildlife. But luckily, that isn't the case.

Historically, we have waited until something is near the complete point of collapse, then fought and clawed to bring the species numbers back up. But oftentimes we wait so long that it's too late. Creatures vanish from the Earth altogether. They go extinct. And even though I don't think for a single second that we should downplay the severity of extinction, if we can flip this on its head and show that every once in a while a species we have given up on is actually still out there, hanging on by a thread against all odds, that is a story that deserves to be told. A tragic story of loss becomes one about an animal that deserves a shot at preservation and a message of hope the world deserves to hear.

As a wildlife biologist and tracker who has dedicated his life to the pursuit of animals I believe have been wrongfully deemed extinct, I spend most of my time in super remote corners of the Earth, hoping to find some shred of evidence that these incredible creatures are still out there. And to be frank, I'm pretty damn good at it!

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The Planet

Antidepressants in U.S. Waterways Giving Fish Anxiety, Homicidal Behavior

Flowing into our rivers and streams, antidepressants from human waste is affecting fish behavior, making them anxious and anti-social.



Among the prescription drugs found in U.S. waterways, antidepressants routinely edge out all other medications discarded or excreted by an increasing percentage of Americans struggling with anxiety disorder.

New research indicates that all that foreign chemistry lining our waterways is having an adverse effect on fish behavior, plaguing them with anxiety, anti-social behavior, and homicidal tendency. The unpublished research, conducted by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, exposed trace amounts of Prozac to young, developing fathead minnows and recorded the results.

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There are around 2.6 million miles of paved roads in the United States, and more than 11 million miles worldwide. What if they could be put to use generating electricity, through solar panels?

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Too Many Elephants: A GOOD Mini-Documentary Video: African Elephant Overpopulation Poses Environmental Threat

What happens when elephants and humans have a hard time coexisting? Africa looks for answers.

We've always been taught that elephants are an endangered species. But some areas of Africa are experiencing problems with elephant overpopulation, which poses a threat to the ecosystem, animal biodiversity, and ultimately to humans. There are some controversial population-control methods, but what is the most environmentally friendly answer?

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Intermission: Rare Footage of the "Arctic Unicorn"

Take a quick break and watch one of the most beautiful—and dangerous—wildlife migrations in the world.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44sjE_x1X4k

This is just beautiful. In this "unique aerial sequence," you'll see the mysterious migration of the narwhal, often called the "Arctic unicorn." The whales' migration is famously perilous, as shifts in the ice can trap these mammals underwater.

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