GOOD

@GOOD Asks: What's the Difference Between a Good Teacher and a Great Teacher? The Community Responds

Yesterday on Twitter and Facebook, we asked our friends: What's the difference between a good teacher and a great teacher?

GOOD and University of Phoenix are proud to announce the launch of The Great American Teach-Off for teachers in grades 7 through 12. Last time, we found amazing teachers who taught in grades kindergarten through sixth grade, so now it's the chance for middle school and high school teachers to get involved! (Click here to see which elementary school teacher won).


We pose a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithfuls once a day, so if you’re not yet a @GOOD follower or fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

Here's a sampling of responses from our Twitter:





And here is what our Facebook buddies had to say:




Want us to ask the GOOD community something?­ Tweet or Facebook your question to us.

Articles
via National Nurses United/Twitter

An estimated eight million people in the U.S. have started a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for their own or a member of their household's healthcare costs, according to a survey released Wednesday.

The poll, which was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, also found that in addition to the millions who have launched crowdfunding efforts for themselves or a member of their household, at least 12 million more Americans have started crowdfunding efforts for someone else.

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Health
via Library of Congress

In the months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the military to move Japanese-Americans into internment camps to defend the West Coast from spies.

From 1942 to 1946, an estimated 120,000 Japanese Americans, of which a vast majority were second- and third-generation citizens, were taken from their homes and forced to live in camps surrounded by armed military and barbed wire.

After the war, the decision was seen as a cruel act of racist paranoia by the American government against its own citizens.

The internment caused most of the Japanese-Americans to lose their money and homes.

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Communities

Step by step. 8 million steps actually. That is how recent college graduate and 22-year-old Sam Bencheghib approached his historic run across the United States. That is also how he believes we can all individually and together make a big impact on ridding the world of plastic waste.

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The Planet