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Tom Hanks Reminds Us Of America’s Resilience In A Moving Speech

“​But we will move forward, because if we do not move forward, what is to be said about us?”

On Tuesday night, Tom Hanks took a night that was supposed to be all about him and made an effort to reassure everyone that despite its troubles, America isn’t going anywhere. At a Museum of Modern Art event honoring the actor, he acknowledged that it’s been a rough week for those opposed to Donald Trump, but assured the world that we’ll get through whatever’s thrown our way.

When given the chance to speak, he offered up some thoughts consistent with the public image of the lauded actor – thoughtful, kind, and warm.


His comments, via New York Mag:

“We are going to be all right, because we constantly get to tell the whole world who we are. We constantly get to define ourselves as Americans. We do have the greatest country in the world. We may move at a slow pace, but we do have the greatest country in the world, because we are always moving towards a more perfect Union. That journey never ceases. It never stops. Sometimes, like in a Bruce Springsteen song, one step forward, two steps back. But we still, aggregately, move forward. We, who are a week into wondering what the hell just happened, will continue to move forward. We have to choose to do so. But we will move forward, because if we do not move forward, what is to be said about us?

Though Hanks didn’t mention Trump or even the election specifically, he’s gone on record with his thoughts on the president-elect, stating to Sky News in April, “I think that man will be president of the United States right about the time spaceships come down filled with dinosaurs in red capes.” (We’re waiting for those caped dinosaurs now, Tom.)

It’s not a stretch to say that many view him in a paternal fashion, and earlier comments while hosting SNL did little to shake that perception when he said, “America is feeling a little nervous these days and I’m a responsible father, so I thought maybe it’s time we had a little chat. You’re going to be fine.”

So while he may be a full-time actor (and a fine one at that), Mr. Hanks knows that he can comfort the public a little during troubled times and, thankfully, doesn’t seem to shy away from that responsibility.

And if you need him to make you laugh, well…he can do that too:

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via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

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