GOOD

[UPDATE] Your Neighborday Toolkit is Here

Introducing a holiday to people you barely know is easier said than done. Regardless of what you think of the people living in your...

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Introducing a holiday to people you barely know is easier said than done. Regardless of what you think of the people living in your neighborhood, we hope you can find something useful among these following resources that will add value to your Neighborday participation. Check out the added materials, including nametags and an official "This is a GOOD Neighborhood" poster.


Admit it: When you first heard about Neighborday, you were a bit reluctant. It sounded like a clever ploy of that guy around the corner on the sex offender list to launch a local hopscotch league. This Neighborday, maybe aim to simply break the ice with those people living in your immediate proximity.

Print out one of these suckers, fill it out and slip it under the door of a neighbor who you barely know. Then head for the hills. We’re pretty sure you won’t end up with a restraining order and you might even make that awkward interaction in the elevator each morning a little less awkward.


Down with the cause, but simply stretched too thin to throw a balls-out block party? Celebrate Neighborday through modest means and streamline your life in the process.

Create a phone tree among your neighbors, print and then distribute. You’ll immediately sense an increased interconnectedness without feeling like you’re lost in Mr. Rogers’ land of make believe. Plus, you never know when having that name and number in your phone will come in handy.


If forging ties with those who live nearby is the cherry on top of your existential ice cream sundae, then have we got a neighboring assignment for you. Host a Neighborday party with these added nametags.

Print out an official "This is a GOOD Neighborhood" poster, you Neighboring Nut, and prove to all of those around you why neighboring is all it’s cracked up to be. If you like being the center of attention, put on an apron and chef’s hat and orchestrate a backyard barbeque. If you’re OCD about spring cleaning, maybe try coordinating an everybody-on-the-block yard or stoop sale. If you’re a neat freak, purchase some industrial-strength garbage bags and wrangle your neighbors for a quick street cleanup.


So you’re a big-shot social innovator. Well, anyone can talk the talk, but can you walk the walk? Bring your game to neighboring. Porchfest, movie night? Roving dinner party? Barnraising? Guerrilla garden planting? You’re the one with the big ideas, come up with a collaborative activity to improve your neighborhood with your neighbors and set in motion on Neighborday. Email neighborday@goodinc.com with your plans and participate in our video challenge.

Neighborday is a new idea, and it needs your help to bring it to life. So however big or small you end up going with your neighboring plans, here’s a few last things to keep in mind:

1. Please go here and click the green Do It button to add yourself to growing group of founding mothers and fathers of this new holiday. By doing so you’ll also get helpful tips and reminders along the way.

2. Help us document what Neighborday looks like, feels like and sounds like to set the example for years to come. Tweet and instagram with #neighborday and if you want to contribute to our collaborative Neighborday Documentary, click this link for ideas as to the kind of material we’re looking for.

3. Spread the word. Tell your friends and family near and far that April 27 is Neighborday.


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