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The Mobile Justice App Records and Reports Police Encounters

The ACLU just launched a version of its app for California.

The ACLU of California and the Ella Baker Center (EBC) launched a new app on Thursday that will allow Californians to record videos to report police encounters from their phone. The Mobile Justice CA app—versions of which are available for Nebraska, Oregon, and Missouri—not only captures and saves video, it also immediately transmits the footage to the ACLU, before law enforcement officers might have an opportunity to delete the video from the phone.

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Would Body Cams Have Saved Walter Scott?

The North Charleston Police Department recently received approval to implement the video technology, potentially preventing the fatal shooting of an unarmed man.

Image via YouTube screencapture

A shaky cellphone video taken by a bystander capturing the final moments of 50-year-old Walter L. Scott was enough to expose the deceit in Officer Michael Slager’s dispatch, in which he tries to justify firing eight bullets at the fleeing black man.

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Is Online Standardized Testing the Key to Ending Cheating?

In the wake of Atlanta's massive scandal, why aren't more states copying the SAT and GRE and moving their high stakes tests online?



With 178 educators implicated in Atlanta's massive standardized test cheating scandal, the integrity of high-stakes testing is coming under scrutiny. At the heart of the scandal: The allegation that teachers, school testing coordinators and principals erased student's incorrect answers and bubbled in correct responses. Atlanta isn't alone.

In my days working in schools, many teachers told me a similar story: Students they knew couldn't read on grade level somehow scored well on the reading comprehension sections of state tests. These teachers assumed that someone had gone through the testing booklet, erased the wrong answers, and penciled in the correct ones. Erasure patterns suggest that similar activity is happening in schools from Washington, D.C. to Houston.

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Today, President Obama addressed the National Urban League just days after that organization and several others criticized his administrations' education policies for leaving behind low income and minority children. While standing up for his agenda, he also took time out to try and court teachers, who (along with their unions) have felt like the scapegoats of the education reform movement.

Asked yesterday by the ladies of The View if he knew who Snooki was, Obama plead ignorance. Today, he said that it's less important to know some MTV personality than to venerate our teachers. "The question is: Who are we lifting up?," he asked. "Who are we promoting? Who are we saying is important?"

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