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U.S. Government Might Be Ready to Fight BP For Real

The Department of Justice has some pretty strong words for BP. "Gross" and "negligence" are two of them.

It may feel like the Deepwater Horizon accident and ensuing spill happened a long time ago, but the impacts will be long-lasting and the legal fight is far from over. The government's position has been clear: Early on, a White House commission called the event "entirely preventable."

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Wait, a Fishing Hook That Sets Tuna Free?

These new "weak hooks" bend enough to give a greater percentage of the Gulf's bluefin tuna a fighting chance when they're caught accidentally.

If everyone in New York took one or two bites of otoro—the prized belly cut of bluefin tuna—it would probably be enough to wipe the species out of the Atlantic, bringing the prospect of peak tuna one step closer to reality. Making matters worse, bluefin tuna breed in the Gulf of Mexico, and, in addition to the uncertain but undoubtedly harmful consequences of last year's oil spill, they're being caught accidentally by longliners fishing for your canned light tuna (yellowfin) and swordfish.

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Top Twelve American Banks, Coal and Oil Companies Paid Less Taxes Than You

This great infographic shows how the dirtiest dozen American corporations are gaming the system and paying less than you in taxes.


Yesterday, along with hundreds of millions of Americans, you likely settled up your taxes formally with the IRS. Incredibly, most of the biggest and most profitable finance and energy companies in the country are paying far less than their fair share. Last, month, Alex wrote about the most startling—and highest profile—incident involving GE, the country's largest corporation.

The Rainforest Action Network reviewed the nation's top four banks, oil and coal companies, and "found that all of them are gaming the system." RAN put out a great infographic that shows just how egregiously the companies are ducking their tax responsibilities. The companies studied: Bank of America, Citi, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo, Chevron, BP, Shell, Exxon, Massey Energy, Alpha Natural Resources, Peabody Energy and Arch Coal. The graphic is pretty cluttered (click through to see the original, larger version), but it's worth examining to see how some of the biggest corporations in the country avoid paying taxes.

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Intermission: Gulf Life

Watch what happened after the spill and after the cameras left.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsZnfkZFozs

This year's ASME Digital Ellie for video went to The Oxford American for “SoLost,” a series shot by New York photographer Dave Anderson exploring people and places across the South.

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Bad Idea: Louisiana Looks to Spend BP Cleanup Money on a Big Party Instead

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal wants to use BP oil spill funds for the state's upcoming bicentennial celebration.


As another oil spill poisons the waters off Louisiana less then a year after the BP Deepwater Horizon spill fouled the Gulf of Mexico for months, you'd think Louisiana state officials would be pretty concerned with how best to clean up the multiple environmental disasters literally on their horizon. You'd be wrong.

Instead, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal wants to throw a big party for the state's bicentennial celebrations, which begin September 2011. According to the Associated Press, Jindal has asked Lieutenant Governor Jay Dardenne to spend some of the money Dardenne's office received from BP after the oil spill—money to be used for, you know, the cleanup efforts—on the 200-years party. Dardenne oversees the Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, which got $6.5 million for spill-related advertising, not, one would think, for Jindal's celebration plans.

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