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Will Ticketmaster's Small-Change Lawsuit Really Help Concertgoers?

Only the lawyers will line their pockets, but the Ticketmaster settlement is one more wake-up call for a troubled industry.

In the last few weeks, nearly every warm-blooded American who’s ponied up for a big-ticket event in the 21st century has received an email alerting them to a proposed settlement of a lawsuit against Ticketmaster few had ever heard of.

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Something Doesn’t Add Up The Maddening Math of Crime Shows

Crunching the numbers on a crime show that’s supposed to be about math


The former CBS show Numb3rs, otherwise known as CSI-Math or “the show with the number three in its title,” is one of those series that seems like it was never actually on, that it came into this world already in syndication. You can usually find a rerun on at around 3 in the morning. I turn to it at the end of the night, when all is dark and the demands of the day have been silenced. I find the show both unwatchable and mesmerizing. No matter how much I tell myself not to look at it, there will be those moments of intractable curiosity when I’ll glance.

Numb3rs is about a crack FBI agent named Don Eppes and his young, math superstar/professor brother, Charlie. It’s a crime drama, but it’s not one of those blunt-hammer crime dramas where they rely on played-out police techniques like interrogation, blood samples, and wiretapping. No, these guys use math. Why math? Because math explains everything, even the allure of a show about math.

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A Digital Time Capsule Will Archive the Websites 21st Century Students Find Relevant

The Internet Archive and the Library of Congress are creating a collection of websites that represent the modern student experience.

How will future generations know what websites 21st century students accessed and considered critical to their lives and learning experiences? It turns out the archeologist of tomorrow won't be digging up a time capsule from someone's backyard. Thanks to the K12 Web Archiving Program, a three-year-old partnership between the Internet Archive and the Library of Congress, students at 14 schools in 13 states are creating digital time capsules of the sites they believe are representative of the modern student experience. In the process, these student curators are also learning valuable critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving skills.

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How They Wrote The Simpsons, by a Vintage Writer

A writer from The Simpsons' glory years tells how they made the classic episodes.

During the glory years of The Simpsons—either the first 10 seasons or seasons three through eight if you want to get picky—the show was groundbreaking, incomparably clever, and built on a foundation of unprecedented use of allusion. Bill Oakley, who wrote for the show for seasons four through six and produced it during seasons seven and eight, just penned a reflection for The Awl on how the impressive roster or writers crafted those classic episodes.

Here's a bit about the biannual writers' pitch retreats:

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The 80 Most Powerful Octogenarians Are a Spry Bunch

The 80 most influential people over 80 are pioneers, personalities, or living tributes to perseverance and self-preservation. Especially Wesley Brown.

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