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GOOD Design Daily: Type Made from the Sky

Lisa Rienermann's Type the Sky project uses the spaces between buildings to form the letters of the alphabet, from A to Z.



We've all contemplated the unique shapes created where the buildings meet blue sky while strolling our favorite cities. But photographer and illustrator Lisa Rienermann took those shapes one step further, arranging the voids into a typographic language that's literally constructed from the skyline. Type the Sky was created in 2008, and it's a beauty.

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GOOD Design Daily: Oscar-Worthy Posters for Oscar-Nominated Films

A British illustrator has re-imagined the posters for five Academy Award films that captures their essence better than those studio-produced ads.



The Academy Awards are this Sunday night and even though this is an exceptionally strong year for visually-stunning films (go Black Swan!), Hollywood has (typically) left something to be desired in the promotional poster department. Mr Shabba, also known as the British designer and illustrator Dean Walton, has taken it upon himself to recast five nominated films as gorgeous illustrated prints, which are now available for purchase.

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GOOD Design Daily: The World's Best-Designed Newspaper

The Society of News Design has named a Portuguese publication as the world's best-designed newspaper. Print has never been so alive.



No, it's not The New York Times, and it's certainly not The Daily. According to the Society of News Design's Best of Newspaper Design Creative Competition, the best-designed newspaper in the world is i, short for informação, which is—congrats if you guessed it—Portuguese. Yes, the world's best-designed newspaper is a colorful, less-than-two-year-old, small-format tabloid paper published in Portugal. Who knew?

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GOOD Design Daily: Michael Bierut's 100-Day Design Workshop

For the past five years, Michael Bierut has been giving his students a simple assignment: Perform a "design operation" and repeat it for 100 days.


Undertaking a daily project—conceptualizing, executing, and documenting some task every 24 hours—has become a popular exercise for designers and people in other creative fields. This process seems to push these poor self-experimenters to the brink of sanity somewhere near day 87, but it also spurs exceptionally creative thought. Over at Design Observer, Michael Bierut writes about a workshop he's given at Yale for the past five years where he tells design students to perform a "design operation" once a day, for 100 days.

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GOOD Design Daily: How a NASA Designer Explains Space

Dan Goods, a designer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, helps explain the vastness and complexity of space to an eager audience.


Most scientific institutions try to educate the public in two ways: in overwritten jargon that no one understands, or with poorly-crafted visuals that no one understands. Not so at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the NASA outpost in Pasadena, California, that handles the Mars Rover missions, among others. According to this excellent article by Holly Willis at AIGA's Voice, JPL is making a connection with science enthusiasts thanks to Dan Goods, a graphic designer by training who uses data visualizations and large scale installations to help explain ungraspable facts and figures to the general public.

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