GOOD

Between Alexa, Siri, and Google, artificial intelligence is quickly changing us and the way we live. We no longer have to get up to turn on the lights or set the thermostat, we can find the fastest route to work with a click, and, most importantly, tag our friends in pictures. But interacting with the world isn't the only thing AI is making easier – now we can use it save the world, too.

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Good News

An anonymous White House official claims President Trump cruelly limited Hispanic immigrants in their new book, "A Warning."

The book, to be released on November 19, gives an alleged insider account of the Trump White House and paints a picture of the president as a chaotic man who lacks the mental and moral acumen required for the job.

The anonymous staffer says that Trump once feigned a Hispanic accent and made fun of women attempting to immigrate to the U.S.

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Politics
via Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The 2020 election is a year away, but Donald Trump has some serious ground to cover if he doesn't want it to be a historical blowout.

A Washington Post- ABC News poll released Tuesday shows that Trump loses by double digits to the top Democratic contenders.

Vice President Joe Biden (56%-39%); Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts (54%-39%); Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont (56%-39%); South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg (52%-41%); and Sen. Kamala Harris of California (52%-41%) all have big leads over the president.

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Politics
via Reddit

When parents choose not to vaccinate their children, they are taking what they believe to be calculated risk: to protect my child from a vaccination injury, such as autism, I will put them at risk of developing a host of diseases, including measles, tetanus, mumps, polio, hepatitis B, and diphtheria.

They also choose to put others, especially babies that are too young to be immunized, at risk of life-threatening illnesses.

This reasoning is incredibly selfish given the fact that there is absolutely no evidence that vaccinations cause autism.

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Health

North Carolina was the only state where it wasn't considered a crime to continue to have sex with someone after they revoked their consent. The loophole was a result of a 1979 court decision. In State v. Way, the North Carolina Supreme Court determined if "the actual penetration is accomplished with the woman's consent, the accused is not guilty of rape, although he may be guilty of another crime because of his subsequent actions." As a result, many sexual assault victims felt that they couldn't report their experiences, and if they did, they'd find out the system was rigged against them.

Now, North Carolina is entering the 21st century when it comes to sexual assault. The North Carolina legislature unanimously voted to modernize their consent laws. "This is the most common sense piece of legislation we'll ever pass," state Senator Jeff Jackson told NBC News. "Every year victims would call us, share their stories and ask why this loophole still existed." Sen. Jackson also called the law, "a big win for basic decency." After 40 years, no will finally mean no.

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Creative Commons

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, breast augmentation is the most popular form of cosmetic surgery in the country. Some women choose to get breast implants for cosmetic reasons, while others use them to rebuild after undergoing mastectomies for breast cancer. In 2018, 310,000 breast augmentations were performed, which is a 4% increase from 2017. However, it comes with many risks that women night not be aware of.

Breast implants aren't permanent and need to be removed or replaced every eight to ten years, yet the FDA says 20% of women have to get their implants removed sooner because of complications. Some complications can include severe muscle and joint pain, scarring, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and rupture. There's even a term for it – "breast implant illness." As bad as those symptoms sound, they can also be worse; 573 people developed a rare form of blood cancer because of their implants, and 33 people have died.

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Health