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Blu Dot Will Trade You a Brand New Couch for Your Art Project

Blu Dot is trading real furniture, worth thousands of dollars, for your most unique swap offerings. Here are some winners so far.


The spunky furniture company Blu Dot is running a savvy promotion that hinges on customer creativity. It's called Blu Dot Swap Meet and they're offering pretty much everything in their furniture line for whatever you have to offer. No money needed, though a photo will go a long way.

Blu Dot gets to pick what swaps to settle on, and so far they're rewarding originality more than resale value.




A college-style kegger earned a desk chair. A brisket BBQ for 60 people won a three-seater couch and a promise to paint portraits on egg shells is apparently worth a magazine rack. Personally, I was inspired by the pair of these custom suitcase speakers that snagged a floor lamp despite clearly spending their time collecting dust in a basement.

Here is my hastily conceived bid for a table lamp using items found in my kitchen. I bet you can do better though. Lemme know if you submit a creative bid. Check out the accepted bids for inspiration.

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via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

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