GOOD

Parents are sharing pictures of their kids in helmets to support Chrissy Teigen’s son.

The number of helmeted infants is on the rise. Here’s why it’s a good thing.

Image via Chrissy Teigen / Instagram.

Have you noticed there are more and more babies wearing helmets these days? According to Houston Public Media, as many as 47% of infants have been found to have some degree of the condition called brachycephaly – when an infant’s skull flattens after prolonged periods of laying on its back.


Although a rise in children with misshapen heads seems like a serious problem, it’s actually the result of a positive trend in infant health.

To help prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS, pediatricians have recommended that newborns and infants sleep on their backs. This change in sleeping habits has caused a dramatic decrease in SIDS, but an increase in brachycephaly.

Recently, model, chef, and TV personality Chrissy Teigen showed off her son Miles’ new head-shaping helmet, but said that no one should worry about her little “bug.”

“baby miles getting fitted for a little helmet today for his adorable slightly misshapen head,” she wrote on Twitter. “so if you see pictures, don't feel bad for him because he’s just fixing his flat and honestly he’s probably gonna be even cuter with it somehow.”

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Teigen has a long history of being an open book on social media and in interviews. She’s talked candidly about her drinking problem, postpartum depression, pregnancy, fertility problems, plastic surgery, and life with her husband, singer John Legend.

Like it or not, celebrities hold huge sway over our dialog on these important problems. So her willingness to admit she has them is comforting to those with the same troubles.

Now, she’s letting parents and kids everywhere know that it’s totally cool to rock a helmet.

To show their solidarity, other parents have been responding to Teigen’s post with adorable pictures of their own children and their head-shaping helmets.

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