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Why It’s Important to Help Women in Technical Careers

This content is brought to you by IBM


For many, career paths are clear, as they set goals to climb the ladder, while many still, opt to change direction after spending time in one field or another. But for women in technical jobs, the turnover rate is double that of men. Midway through their careers, 56 percent of women with technical jobs leave their work.

But where are they going? Some leave the work force entirely, likely due to a variety of reasons from unemployment to family obligations and others take on non-technical jobs. For the women who have been out of the work force and want to reenter, it can be hard in a fast paced field to be up to speed with the latest technologies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

Around the globe, companies like IBM are finding ways to help bring women to the technology sector and onto a technical career path, from investing in women without traditional technical backgrounds to offering mentorships, they’re supporting women who can become the next group of technical leaders.

IBM is investing in women, whether new to the company, previous employees or current employees. It is providing support through mentoring and networks that can create a foundation for a career path towards technical leadership roles. Its Technologista YouTube series offers an inside glimpse at what the women at IBM are doing. Read more about women at IBM here.

This is the second infographic in a series of three about women in the technology workforce. View the first one here.

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