GOOD
"IMG_0846" by Adrienne Campbell is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In an effort to avoid a dystopian sci-fi future where Artificial Intelligence knows pretty much everything about you, and a team of cops led by Tom Cruise run around arresting people for crimes they did not commit because of bad predictive analysis; Bernie Sanders and other Democratic candidates have some proposals on how we can stop it.

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Culture
via Frank Schwichtenberg / Wikimedia Commons

Swiss auto manufacturer Rinspeed has a released a new concept car called the Oasis that's jam-packed with every feature you could possibly want — plus some you didn't even know you needed — including a garden beneath the hood.

Most importantly, it provides the industry with a glimpse into the future of transportation. The car is great for the environment, has incredible safety features, and can senselessly integrate into its passenger's lifestyle via artificial intelligence.

The Oasis is an electric car designed for personal ownership or as a self-driving, ride-sharing vehicle. Its hatchback design is almost completely see-through and it has a 5K display screen.

In the future, when everything is self-driving, the Oasis' steering wheel can be turned into a table, so you can start work early on your morning commute. It has a top speed of 80 miles per hour and solar panels are integrated into the roof design.

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Innovators

Image via mybuddytag.com

At this past weekend's North American International Toy Fair in New York, not every participant was a toymaker. In the back of the huge space was a booth for BuddyTag—a smart wristband that helps parents monitor children within 120 feet. BuddyTag was invented by Willie Wu after he lost his daughter at Six Flags. “His child did everything right—waiting in one place with an employee of the park," said Wu's sister, who was stationed at the booth. The kid was found in an hour, “but it was the worst hour of his life." It also sparked an idea.

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Articles

Via YouTube

Cavemen must have been perpetually late, given that humans didn’t get around to inventing the sundial until 1500 BCE. The first attempts at measuring time via sun movement were shadow clocks created by the Egyptians and Babylonians. These led to the sundial, an instrument that tells time by measuring shadows cast by the sun on a dial plate. Sundials were our preferred method of timekeeping until the mechanical clock was invented in 14th-century Europe.

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Articles

MIT’s Super-Fast Camera Can Capture Light as it Travels

It has a resolution rate of one frame per trillionth of a second.

via YouTube

A new camera developed at MIT can photograph a trillion frames per second. Compare that with a traditional movie camera which takes a mere 24. This new advancement in photographic technology has given scientists the ability to photograph the movement of the fastest thing in the Universe, light. In the video below, you’ll see experimental footage of light photons traveling 600-million-miles-per-hour through water. The actual event occurred in a nano second, but the camera has the ability to slow it down to twenty seconds. For some perspective, according to New York Times writer, John Markoff, “If a bullet were tracked in the same fashion moving through the same fluid, the resulting movie would last three years.”

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Articles

If you thought this GIF of a dog swatting his birthday cake was the pinnacle of greatness, hang on to your hats.

via GIPHY

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Articles