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Education

How Does the Education in Your State Compare to the Rest of the World?

A fascinating map of each state’s educational level and its equivalent to a country in the world.

It's no secret that our country's education system is in chaos. The rise and fall of Common Core is just one example. But while the debate rages on over national standards, the level of education in our country can vary widely, state by state, district by district, school by school.

The website Home Snacks created a map of each state's educational level and its equivalent to a country. Using the U.S. Census, they factored in each state's high school graduation rate, and then compared those numbers to the education index of each country in the world, according to the United Nations Development Programme.

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Education

San Francisco Is The First U.S. City To Make Community College Free To All Residents

A similar program in Tennessee is seeing positive results.

THE GOOD NEWS:

San Francisco provides its residents with greater educational opportunities.

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Education

Print Still Matters — Especially For Students

A new series of studies finds that reading from screens isn't great for classroom success.

Today’s students see themselves as digital natives, the first generation to grow up surrounded by technology like smartphones, tablets, and e-readers.

Teachers, parents, and policymakers certainly acknowledge the growing influence of technology and have responded in kind. We’ve seen more investment in classroom technologies, with students now equipped with school-issued iPads and access to e-textbooks. In 2009, California passed a law requiring that all college textbooks be available in electronic form by 2020; in 2011, Florida lawmakers passed legislation requiring public schools to convert their textbooks to digital versions.

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Education

You’ll Need More Than Perfect Grades To Get Into America’s Top Universities

“We should discard the notion that admissions is a meritocratic process that selects the 'best' 18-year-olds who apply to a selective university.”

After weeks of negotiation, Harvard University recently agreed to provide the Department of Justice access to its admissions files.

The department is reopening a complaint by 63 Asian-American groups that Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants. The complaint was previously dismissed under the Obama administration. Many worry that government lawyers plan to use the case to argue that all race-conscious admissions – including affirmative action – are a violation of the Civil Rights Act.

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Education