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Not Worried About Artificial Intelligence? These Geniuses Think You Should Be

What do Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Stephen Hawking have in common? They’re all worried about the dangers of A.I.

image via (cc) flickr user zen_warden

Ordinarily, if someone were to start lecturing me on the dangers of artificial intelligence, I’d smile, nod, and maybe mumble something about how how Disney’s Wall-E was “still pretty great though,” before politely excusing myself and blocking the entire conversation from my memory. That said, when it’s someone considered by many to be one of the smartest men on the planet doing the talking... well, I’m a little more inclined to pay attention.

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Intermission: Why Don't They Teach Coding in Schools?

Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates on why more schools should be teaching students how to code.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKIu9yen5nc

Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates on how coders are the new rock stars and why more schools should be teaching students how to code.

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Are Teachers Overpaid? One Educator Says Yes

What $1,800-per-month paychecks? D.C. teacher Michael Bromley says his peers should stop complaining because they're actually making too much money.

When I hang out with my friends who are teachers, I always offer to pay for whatever it is we're doing. I've been in their shoes so I know they're not exactly rolling in dough. Even U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently said that teacher salaries should start at $60,000 and educators should have the opportunity to earn up to $150,000 in merit pay.

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PayPal Billionaire Peter Thiel Should Stop Telling College Students to Drop Out

Thiel's program to turn dropouts into tech entrepreneurs isn't just hypocritical, it's also irresponsible.


We've survived the tech bubble and the housing bubble, but according to Peter Thiel, one of the co-founders of PayPal, we're in the grips of a brand new bubble: higher education. Thiel, who is not a dropout—he attended Stanford for both his undergraduate and law degree—is challenging the idea that you need a degree to succeed in life through a new venture, his "20 Under 20" project. Instead of hiring graduates from the nation's most elite schools, he's paying 20 of them $100,000 to drop out of college, run with their entrepreneurial spirit, and start companies.

Thiel told TechCrunch that, "A true bubble is when something is over-valued and intensely believed," noting that, "Education may be the only thing people still believe in in the United States. To question education is really dangerous. It is the absolute taboo. It’s like telling the world there’s no Santa Claus."

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The GOOD Vaccine Challenge: Winner Announced

Congratulations to Nadim Mahmud. His plan for a text message-based vaccination alert tool for India will get a $5,000 seed grant.

For the GOOD Vaccine Challenge we asked you for ways to increase awareness about—and access to—life-saving vaccines in developing countries. We were stunned by the amazing creativity of our project participants. The submissions ran the gamut, from beautifully designed public information campaigns to innovative biometric solutions. We then asked you, the GOOD community, to select which project should receive a $5,000 seed grant.

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Arne Duncan's Against Seniority-Based Teacher Layoffs

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan wants to change the policy of firing the teachers who've been in the job for the shortest time first.


With draconian cuts looming for state education budgets, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan wants the nation's governors to be clear: Those cuts can't hurt the quality of education children receive. To that end, when it comes to the tough decisions about laying off teachers, Duncan says the days of a last-in-first-out (LIFO) policy of layoffs are over. Instead, student achievement results need to determine which teachers get the axe.

In a conference call with reporters, Duncan denied that he's "danced around the issue" and said that labor and management have a shared responsibility to put students at the center of their relationship. And, if budgets require teachers to be fired, "Layoffs should be based on a number of factors but the most important thing we can do is keep the best teachers in schools where they are needed most."

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