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Remembering the Deepwater Horizon Victims One Year Later

Take a long moment today to think of the eleven Deepwater Horizon workers who lost their lives a year ago today.

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Deepwater Horizon Rig Operator Doles Out Huge Bonuses, Citing "Best Year in Safety"

Transocean calls 2010 their "best year in safety," despite the explosion at their Deepwater Horizon rig that killed eleven.


Transocean, the owner and operator of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, handed out big bonuses to top executives, citing 2010 as its "best year in safety." Acknowledging the Gulf tragedy in a filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company maintained that, “we recorded the best year in safety performance in our company’s history.

The filing continued: "Notwithstanding the tragic loss of life in the Gulf of Mexico, we achieved an exemplary statistical safety record."

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Drilling Deeper Into BP's Sustainability Review

The graph that BP's Sustainability Review leaves out, and what else is missing from the oil company's report.

This morning Cord posted a startling chart about BP's oil spill accounting in their latest Sustainability Review. The chart shows BP's "volume of oil spilled" in 2006, 2008, and 2010, and was pretty infuriating as it didn't include numbers from the Gulf oil spill. Which, obviously, changes things.

Here are the numbers that the graph was culled from:

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Overload: New Gulf Oil Spill, Knut Is Dead, and More

A new Gulf oil spill, Knut the dead polar bear, and more of what we're reading at GOOD Environment HQ.


There appears to be a new oil spill in the Gulf, and it's already rolling up on beaches. Rocky Kistner is on top of it.

The "real cost of nuclear power" is hard-hitting, sober, and, according to some friends in the nuclear field, pretty damn spot-on.

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Grassroots Mapping: How You Can Create Aerial Cartography for Under $100, and Use It to Do Good

How to capture your own aerial imagery that's higher resolution than NASA's, for about $100.

Historically, aerial mapmaking has been handled by governments and businesses alone. Who else could afford to put satellites in orbit or hire planes for private flyovers?

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Flavorwire just posted aerial photographs of the Gulf Oil Spill by Edward Burtynsky, whose Oil series explores the effects of the substance on our daily lives. The images, taken during Burtynsky's trip to the gulf in May, are just striking.

Flaming drilling platforms in oil-blacked seas remind us of potential for further mishaps, while mile long oil slicks recall the damage already done; cargo ships disperse chemicals into the spill, causing the water and oil around them to shift into abstract realms; and marsh island are surrounded by the black gunk, while riptides carry it to distant places. Premiering at Nicholas Metivier Gallery in Toronto, the photographer’s hometown, on September 16, photographs from the Oil Spill series share space at the gallery with Burntynsky’s Pentimento images, which documents the crude process of dismantling massive ships by hand on the beaches of Bangladesh.

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