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Image courtesy of GPlates.org

If you want to see the Earth move, check out GPlates.org—the new and massively detailed suite of virtual globes and interactive maps that visualize how Earth and its continents evolved geologically. Developed by an international team led by University of Sydney researchers, the site offers interactive exploration of supercontinents, including the breakup and dispersal of Pangaea—the supercontinent from which our current topography developed over the last 200 million years.

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The legend of Pompeii has been told countless times, but it's still gripping. The ancient city, along with Herculaneum and other nearby towns, was buried under ash (20 feet of it in some places) when Mount Vesuvius erupted. The date of the eruption is thought to be August 24 in the year 79, just one day after Vulcanalia, the festival of the Roman god of fire. (Some competing research indicates that it may have been as late as October.) Heat was the main cause of death, with hot surges from the volcano reaching as high as 482 degrees.

Pompeii was a favorite vacation destination for Romans. The ruins of Pompeii, preserved under mountains of ash, have been a tourist destination and archeological treasure trove for almost 300 years. Most chilling are the bodies frozen in place. Along with them, the room-size frescoes, jewelry, and even wine bottles, have provided historians with an unmatchable look at quotidian life in ancient Rome.

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Scientists Stunned By One Man's Successful Fight To Save An Island

Killer plants are invading. His response: We don’t want no shrubs.

Felicité island in the Seychelles archipelago near Madagascar. Photo by Maxwell Williams.

THE GOOD NEWS:

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Image via The Science Channel Instagram

We could not be more excited heading toward this weekend’s nationwide March for Science, as it combines all the best things: science, social activism, and creative sign art. Whether you’re a scientist yourself or you casually appreciate the art of systematically studying our surroundings, we could all benefit from expanding our perspectives. For most of us, scientific education ends the moment we graduate high school or finish that required lab course in college.

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