GOOD
AFP News Agency / Twitter

A study out of Belgium found that smart people are much less likely to be bigoted. The same study also found that people who are bigoted are more likely to overestimate their own intelligence.

A horrifying story out of Germany is a perfect example of this truth on full display: an anti-Semite was so dumb the was unable to open a door at the temple he tried to attack.

On Wednesday, October 9, congregants gathered at a synagogue in Humboldtstrasse, Germany for a Yom Kippur service, and an anti-Semite armed with explosives and carrying a rifle attempted to barge in through the door.

Keep Reading Show less
Communities
via Andi-Graf / Pixabay

The old saying goes something like, "Possessions don't make you happy." A more dire version is, "What you own, ends up owning you."

Are these old adages true or just the empty words of ancient party-poopers challenging you not to buy an iPhone 11? According to a new study of 968 young adults by the University of Arizona, being materialistic only brings us misery.

The study examined how engaging in pro-environmental behaviors affects the well-being of millenials. The study found two ways in which they modify their behaviors to help the environment: they either reduce what they consume or purchase green items.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

The Swedish royal family receives an annual sum provided by taxpayers, known as an appendage. They cost taxpayers around $14 million each year, leaving some wondering why they're footing the bill. In order to ease the burden, King Carl XVI Gustaf announced that five of his grandchildren will be stripped of their royal titles. As a result, they will no longer receive taxpayer support. The Royal family acknowledged that their size had grown, and it doesn't need to have so many people available for official duties. "We have a large royal family. If you include the next generation, there are currently 10 people in the line of succession," Fredrik Wersall, the Swedish royal court's top official, said in the media.

Some see the move as an attempt to shut down the conversation as to whether or not the royal family is even necessary. In 2016, Swedish politicians filed a motion to abolish the monarchy and turn the castles into museums. "It is obviously not compatible with democracy because the role of head of state is inherited within the same family. It is time that our head of state added in a democratic manner by competence and capability," Yasmine Larsson, a Social Democrat who co-wrote the motion, said at the time. A 2018 survey conducted by Ipsos Mori found that 28% of respondents felt that abolishing the monarchy would make things better in Sweden.

Keep Reading Show less
via Reddit and NASA / Wikimedia Commons

Trees give us a unique glimpse into our past. An examination of tree rings can show us what the climate was like in a given year. Was it a wet winter? Were there hurricanes in the summer? Did a forest fire ravage the area?

An ancient tree in New Zealand is the first to provide evidence of the near reversal of the Earth's magnetic field over 41,000 years ago.

Over the past 83 million years there have been 183 magnetic pole reversals, a process that takes about 7,000 years to complete.

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet
via Donald Trump / Twitter

In 2005, Canadian grunge rockers Nickelback released a hit single called "Photograph." In the video, lead singer Chad Kroeger holds up a framed picture of himself and Nickelback's producer Joey Moi as the lyric "Look at this photograph" is heard in the background.

In 2008, the image of Kroeger holding up the picture frame became a popular meme. According to Know Your Meme, it started on a page called "Nickelback is racist" and the meme depicted Kroeger holding up a photo of a man in blackface.

Keep Reading Show less

If you were worried about the country turning into one big Handmaid's Tale scenario, you can sleep a little easier tonight. A federal judge blocked the bill from going into effect while it's being challenged. The restrictive law, which would ban abortion after a heartbeat is detected in the fetus, was supposed to go into effect on January 1st of next year. Abortions would be illegal at around six weeks into pregnancy, a point where many women don't even know they're pregnant. Currently, Georgia allows an abortion up to the 20th week of pregnancy, and that's the way it's going to stay for now.

In his ruling, Judge Jones noted that the U.S. supreme court has "repeatedly and unequivocally" held up Roe vs. Wade, and that the Constitution allows a woman to receive an abortion about 24 weeks into her pregnancy. "By banning abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected, HB 481 prohibits women from making the ultimate decision to terminate her pregnancy at a point before viability," District Judge Steve C. Jones said.

Keep Reading Show less