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Twitter is losing its mind after a woman brings home a super creepy doll from an antique shop.

In horror films, victims always ignore the warning signs.

via Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay

Most people die in horror films because they ignore the obvious warning signs that they are going to be killed.


In “Psycho,” Marion Crane pulled up to a shady motel ran by a creep that munches on candy corn and stuffs dead birds. No wonder she wound up dead in a shower.

The kid in “The Shining” kept telling everybody that some “redrum” (read it backward) was about to go down, but nobody paid attention.

The shark in “Jaws” chowed down on at least four people and a dog before the mayor decided to finally close down the beach.

Twitter user @NerdyVixen has received sufficient warning that her days are numbered after she picked up a doll at an antique shop that Marilyn Manson would probably think twice about bringing home.

via Twitter

Just like any victim in a horror film, she gave the doll a good ol’ fashioned name, Abigail, ignoring the fact that it sounds the name of a woman burned at the stake in the 1500s.

The supernaturally-concerned folks on Twitter immediately warned Nerdy Vixen of her grave mistake.

via Twitter

via Twitter

via Twitter

via Twitter

She loved the responses.

via Twitter

She also shared a creepy photo of where Abigail sleeps at night. Watch out BB-8!

via Twitter

Nerdy Vixen fed Abigail some pizza to distract her from the desire to consume human flesh.

via Twitter

Nerdy Vixen told The Daily Dot she purchased Abigail because of a “sense of sadness/loneliness” that overcame her when she first saw the doll. So far, she hasn’t run into any troubles with her dear Abigail, but if strange things begin happening she’ll “burn some sage, ask her to stop” and then, if that didn’t work, “I suppose I could just take her to a different antique shop. Or build a glass case,” she said.

No, Nerdy Vixen, a glass case won’t protect you from Abigail, the resurrected victim of the Salem witch trials, you should probably take precautionary measures and incinerate the doll with fire before anything bad happens. But, then again, that may only make her more powerful.

Good luck.

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