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Fingerless Russian Pianist Is Incredible

His performance was so beautiful that the conductorhad to sit down.

“Whether you believe you can do a thing or not, you are right,” is a famous quote often attributed to automaker Henry Ford. In many respects, he’s right. Far too many of us live with limitations we’ve unfairly placed on ourselves or accepted from other people. But 15-year-old pianist Alexey Romanov of Zelenodolsk, Russia has defied all expectations by becoming an excellent pianist even though he has no fingers, and only one leg.


Romanov was born with a terrible illness that left him without hands and a leg. After being adopted four years ago, he fell in love with Mozart and Vivaldi and decided to learn how to play the piano. He has prosthetic arms, though he prefers not to use them while playing because he finds them uncomfortable. Sadly, his prosthetic leg is broken, but he still walks on it because it’s too expensive for his family to fix.

He recently played a concert with the respected La Primavera chamber orchestra, performing the song “River Flows in You” by South Korean pianist, Yiruma. His performance was so beautiful that the conductor couldn’t believe what he was seeing and had to sit down. In fact, people were so impressed that Romanov was invited to attend a music school in Kazan, Russina. It’s pretty clear that Romonov will do well in school, because it’s obvious the word “can’t” isn’t in his vocabulary.

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