GOOD

Computer Algorithm Spits Out Route For Ultimate American Road Trip

Time to hit the open road and follow these precise directions.

There’s nothing quite so uniquely American as taking a cross-country road trip, and in a country this large the routing options are practically endless. But don’t just hop behind the wheel and see where the wind takes you — that’s the old-timey way of feeling free. These days, we have technology to plan everything out for us, and that brings us data genius Randal Olson. Known for creating a genetic algorithm that plots out the quickest way to find the dude in “Where’s Waldo?”, the computer genius just designed a new program to figure out the best possible route for a drive across the continental United States. Based on the roadtripper visiting 50 landmarks (one in D.C. and an extra one in California), the 13,699 mile-route would take approximately 224 hours to drive (without traffic).

Here’s what the program came up:


Source: Randal Olson

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