GOOD

Photo Series Captures the Deep Bonds Between People and Their Pets

“Humans of New York” has some serious four-legged competition.

Kim Wolf was inspired by the photo series “Humans of New York,” so she decided to expand the idea to a neglected demographic: dogs. Her project, “Dogs of New York,” not only documents images of New Yorkers and their animal companions, it goes a step further. Wolf provides assistance to dog owners who cannot afford to take care of both their pets and themselves. So far she has provided help to about 60 families and over 130 animals, and that number will only rise as the project picks up steam. The Huffington Post put together this video which describes the project in further detail and demonstrates exactly how Wolf has been changing the lives of people and dogs throughout the city.


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