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GOOD Redesigns a Reader's Resume

In our Recession Issue we offered to spruce up the resume of one lucky, design-challenged (or time-strapped) reader. The winner: performing arts...

In our Recession Issue we offered to spruce up the resume of one lucky, design-challenged (or time-strapped) reader. The winner: performing arts professional and good sport Brooke Stelmazewski. GOOD's own Atley Kasky stepped up to the plate for the design work. See the makeover, and design tips from Atley, below.BEFORE


AFTER

ATLEY'S DESIGN NOTES"Establish clear typographical hierarchy-treat different types of information differently, treat the same type of information the same. This helps the reader move through the resume from one point to the other: name to education to experience, and so on.Introducing a second typeface can help to bring attention to critical elements while adding a commonly overlooked but visually compelling contrast.Utilize bold and oblique (italic) versions of your selected typefaces carefully. The goal is to let them support your structure instead of adding more complexity.Typographic rules (horizontal lines) can help break up different kinds of information and help the reader quickly find what they are looking for.Center justified is not always a good thing, in fact, it often obstructs the flow of reading.Keep flair to a minimum. The resume is a tool and with that, we suggest function over form: legibility of vital information should not be compromised by decorative or background elements. We decided to maintain a hint of pink because it retained and communicated a little personality.Consider your white (negative) space. The negative space on a page is as important as the information on it. A resume is a representation of yourself; control the content and the space around it through both editing and design."
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