GOOD

Join Us for GOOD Ideas for Cities in Dallas on June 6

GOOD Ideas for Cities pairs creative problem-solvers with real urban challenges

For our fifth event of 2012, GOOD Ideas for Cities is headed to Dallas.


GOOD Ideas for Cities taps creative problem-solvers to tackle real urban challenges proposed by civic leaders and present the solutions at live events across the country. Thanks to our partnership with CEOs for Cities and a generous grant from ArtPlace, we're taking the program to six cities in 2012. If you're in Dallas, join us on June 6 to see three visions for the city's future.

Last month, we issued a call for Dallas creatives and formed three teams to represent the city. Each team was issued a challenge proposed by local urban leaders and began working together on a solution. At the event, the creative teams will present their solutions, and the urban leaders will join them onstage for a brief Q&A. Afterward, we'll have drinks and more conversation as we discuss how to make these ideas a reality.

Wednesday, June 6
Doors and refreshments at 6:00 p.m.
Program begins at 7:15 p.m.

The Lakewood Theater
1825 Abrams Parkway
Dallas, TX 75214

RSVP here.

Hosted by AIGA DFW and DFW Design for Good

Special thanks to our partners IDSA Texas, AIA Dallas, The Dallas Center for Architecture, David Anthony Harman and Lily Smith-Kirkley

Supported by ArtPlace

The Challenges

1. The neighborhood around Edgefield and Ferndale in Oak Cliff is a medium-sized, auto-based commercial district surrounded by singl- family neighborhoods. The neighborhoods appear to be stable and well maintained, but the commercial center includes many small, vacant spaces. How do improve use of this under-used commercial space?

Daniel Oney, Office of Economic Development, City of Dallas

Elmwood Neighborhood Revitalization: Mark Lea,Whitney Holden, Krystyna Morgan, Justin Tiros

2. The City of Dallas has more than 110 miles of hiking and biking trails. But due to lack of branding, non-existent wayfinding system and a comprehensive electronic field guide, many citizens don't know that this incredible resource exists. How do we connect the dots so local residents, business owners and developers not only know about, but make better use of our hike and bike trails?

Samuel Stites, Dallas Parks Foundation; Joan Walne, Dallas Park Board; Michael Hellman, Park Planning & Acquisitions; David Whitney, Dallas City Design Studio

Connect the Dots / Bike Hike Trails: Brian Murphy, Robbie Good, Cyndi Long, David Whitley, Deana Jirak, Edna Monterrosa, Erin Hanley, Jared White, Joel Landingham, Katie Galasso, Lacy Barnett-Cagle, Mikel Wilkins

3. It's a common perception that Texans won't take transit, ride bicycles, or walk, other than to get to their pickup truck. Now with the largest light rail system in the United States, it is time to change Dallas' image into one of a truly multi-modal city. How might we transform the 55+ stations in the system into centers of social and economic activity, creating a vibrant network of communities connected by various modes of transit?

Jack Wierzenski, DART

Transformation Stations: J.B. Chaykowsky, Hon Yam Mok, Charlotte Hicks Todd, T.E. Sumner, Jeremy Klott

Check out the videos from our other events and stay tuned for details about future GOOD Ideas for Cities announcements. If you'd like to talk about bringing the program to your city or school, email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com or follow us at @IdeasforCities

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