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Image via Twitter

On July 4, 1776, 13 American colonies declared their independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain in a formal statement known as the Declaration of Independence. The document asserts specific rights and lists grievances against the tyrannical King George III. For the past 29 years, National Public Radio has celebrated the Fourth of July by reading the Declaration of Independence on air. This year, to compliment the broadcast, NPR also tweeted out portions of the document as well.


Given the hypersensitivity of the current political landscape, NPR couldn’t even tweet about one of America’s most sacred documents without riling up Donald Trump supporters. Some were confused by the tweets and assumed that NPR was either calling out Trump or calling for Americans to take up arms and rebel.

One Trump supporter thought NPR was calling for a revolution.

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Others thought the Declaration of Independence was a piece of biased, liberal propaganda.

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Some fought back against the sacred document.

Some thought the tyrant was Trump.

Some thought NPR’s Twitter feed had been hacked.

One guy realized his mistake and did something rarely seen on social media: he apologized.

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