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Skate-Friendly Starchitecture

Wired reports on a new trend in the high profile, high art brand of architecture wherein stars like Zaha Hadid and Simon Ewings accept-and even embrace-the use of their buildings by skateboarders: "...though the new Oslo Opera House (shown here) was inspired by the image of two glaciers colliding, the..


Wired reports on a new trend in the high profile, high art brand of architecture wherein stars like Zaha Hadid and Simon Ewings accept-and even embrace-the use of their buildings by skateboarders:"...though the new Oslo Opera House (shown here) was inspired by the image of two glaciers colliding, the architects at Snøhetta didn't call on glaciologists to help fine-tune the details. They enlisted real experts in twisted planes: skateboarders. 'We spoke to them about surface textures and the areas they prefer,' architect Simon Ewings says. His firm followed up the conversation with a statement in stone."I'm not sure the Oslo Opera House has, as Wired puts it, "as many gnarly facets as the best skate parks," but it's great that some architects seem to be accommodating skaters. In a country with a growing obesity problem, it seems like the worst kind of catch-22 to cover the landscape with buildings and pavement and then forbid people from using these features for a spontaneous and creative brand of exercise.You might as well chain kids to their PS3s.
Articles
via Library of Congress

In the months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the military to move Japanese-Americans into internment camps to defend the West Coats from spies.

From 1942 to 1946, an estimated 120,000 Japanese Americans, of which a vast majority were second- and third-generation citizens, were taken in their homes and forced to live in camps surrounded by armed military and barbed wire.

After the war, the decision was seen as a cruel act of racist paranoia by the American government against its own citizens.

The interment caused most of the Japanese-Americans to lose their money and homes.

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Communities
via Michael Belanger / Flickr

The head of the 1,100-member Federal Judges Association on Monday called an emergency meeting amid concerns over President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr's use of the power of the Justice Department for political purposes, such as protecting a long-time friend and confidant of the president.

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Politics

North Korea remains arguably the most mysterious place on Earth. Its people and modern day customs are shrouded behind a digital and physical wall of propaganda. Many people in the United States feel that North Korea is our "enemy" but almost none of us have had the opportunity to interact with an actual person who lives in, or has lived under, the country's totalitarian regime.

Even more elusive is what life is like in one of North Korea's notorious prison camps. It's been reported that millions live in horrific conditions, facing the real possibility of torture and death on a daily basis. That's what makes this question and answer session with an escaped North Korean prisoner all the more incredible to read.

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Communities