GOOD

A new study of over 650,000 children finds — once again — that vaccines don’t cause autism.

The science is clear: vaccinations don’t cause autism.

via Russel Harrison Photography / Flickr

We’re a quarter through 2019 and there has already been more measles cases in the first two months of this year than in all of 2017. A major reason for this is the growing number of unvaccinated children in the U.S.


Ninety-two percent of U.S. children have received the MMR vaccine, while that number seems high, the number of children under two who haven’t received any vaccinations has quadrupled in the last 17 years.

The rise of the anti-vaxxer movement is a major reason for the increase in measles and unvaccinated children. In 1998, a study by Andrew Wakefield that linked vaccines to autism published in the medical journal The Lancet, kicked off the modern anti-vaccine movement.

The study was later debunked and Wakefield lost his medical license.

via Alpha / Flickr

Since Wakefield’s fraudulent study was released, there have been over 140 peer-reviewed articles, published in relatively high impact factor or specialized journals that document the lack of a correlation between autism and vaccines.

Now, a new study involving over 650,000 children, has also concluded that the MMR vaccine doesn’t cause autism.

Researchers used a population registry of children in Denmark between 1999 and 2010 to see if the MMR vaccine increased the risk of autism. Ninety-five percent of the 657,461 children were given the MMR vaccine and and 6,517 were diagnosed with autism.

According to the study published in in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, the MMR vaccine didn’t increase the risk of autism in children not considered at risk for the disorder or trigger its onset in those considered at risk.

Unfortunately, the new study may not change many minds in the anti-vaxxer community. In 2005 and 2006, researchers at The University of Michigan found that that when people are confronted with facts that disprove their closely-held beliefs, they often become more strongly set in their beliefs.

Articles

Some beauty pageants, like the Miss America competition, have done away with the swimsuit portions of the competitions, thus dipping their toes in the 21st century. Other aspects of beauty pageants remain stuck in the 1950s, and we're not even talking about the whole "judging women mostly on their looks" thing. One beauty pageant winner was disqualified for being a mom, as if you can't be beautiful after you've had a kid. Now she's trying to get the Miss World competition to update their rules.

Veronika Didusenko won the Miss Ukraine pageant in 2018. After four days, she was disqualified because pageant officials found out she was a mom to 5-year-old son Alex, and had been married. Didusenko said she had been aware of Miss World's rule barring mother from competing, but was encouraged to compete anyways by pageant organizers.

Keep Reading Show less

One mystery in our universe is a step closer to being solved. NASA's Parker Solar Probe launched last year to help scientists understand the sun. Now, it has returned its first findings. Four papers were published in the journal Nature detailing the findings of Parker's first two flybys. It's one small step for a solar probe, one giant leap for mankind.



It is astounding that we've advanced to the point where we've managed to build a probe capable of flying within 15 million miles from the surface of the sun, but here we are. Parker can withstand temperatures of up to 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit and travels at 430,000 miles per hour. It's the fastest human-made vehicle, and no other human-made object has been so close to the sun.

Keep Reading Show less
via Sportstreambest / Flickr

Since the mid '90s the phrase "God Forgives, Brothers Don't" has been part of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point's football team's lexicon.

Over the past few years, the team has taken the field flying a black skull-and-crossbones flag with an acronym for the phrase, "GFBD" on the skull's upper lip. Supporters of the team also use it on social media as #GFBD.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture