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Anti-vaxxer group says the label is 'derogatory' so Twitter roasted them with some hilarious new names

Anti-vaxxers are literally a plague upon society.

Thanks to them, highly contagious diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, and mumps are making a big comeback.

In fact, measles was thought to be eradicated in the US back in 2000 but there has been over 1200 cases in the U.S. this year.

via Centers for Disease Control

"The reason measles is coming back is that a critical number of parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children,'' said Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told USA Today.

"If you get to a few thousand cases, you'll start to see children die of measles again," Offit continued.

Ninety-two percent of U.S. children have received the MMR vaccine, while that number seems high, the number of children under two who haven't received any vaccinations has quadrupled in the last 17 years.

RELATED: A new study of over 650,000 children finds — once again — that vaccines don't cause autism

"More and more we're seeing people opting out of vaccinations out of a feeling they're in some way dangerous, which is absolutely and completely untrue,'' Judd Hultquist, assistant professor of infectious diseases at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told USA Today.

Anti-vaxxers' biggest fear is that vaccinations cause autism.

However, over 140 peer-reviewed articles published in specialized journals that document the lack of a correlation between autism and vaccines. Earlier this year, a study of over 650,000 children in Denmark found that the MMR vaccine didn't increase the risk of autism in children.

Even though anti-vaxxers spread contagious diseases because of their deeply-held, but incorrect, beliefs they want to be taken seriously.

RELATED: Anti-vaxxers cursed at ER staff who helped their son because he was 'isolated' to protect others

The aptly-named anti-vaxxer group Crazymothers made an appeal to the media on Twitter asking to start referring to them as "Vaccine Risk Aware."

"Dear Media," the open letter read. "Please retire the use of the term 'Anti-vaxxer.' It is derogatory, inflammatory, and marginalizes both women and their experiences. It is dismissively simplistic, highly offensive and largely false. We politely request that you refer to us as the Vaccine Risk Aware."

This inspired a flood of people to respond with their own hilarious and sometimes morbid new names for anti-vaxxers.

The tweet also inspired others to tee off on the Crazymothers for hurting children.


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