GOOD

This writer brilliantly explains to Bill Maher why millennials refuse to grow up

It was in response to his comments about Stan Lee's death.

Photo by Nicholas Hunt / Getty Images

Bill Maher, known for his left-wing comedic commentary, made a lot of comic book fans irate over his blog post, “Adulting" posted last November, denouncing the Stan Lee fan culture.


“The guy who created Spider-Man and the Hulk has died, and America is in mourning. Deep, deep mourning for a man who inspired millions to, I don't know, watch a movie, I guess," Maher wrote.

Someone on Reddit posted, 'I'm so incredibly grateful I lived in a world that included Stan Lee,'" Maher continued. “Personally, I'm grateful I lived in a world that included oxygen and trees, but to each his own. “

Many fans of Stan Lee, and the Marvel Universe he helped create, were offended by Maher's remarks. The comedian says he is still harassed by people on the street and on social media for his blog post. So Maher took to his show, “Real Time" to shut them down for good.

“To every person on social media who's asked me since November, 'Bill, what do you have to say about Stan Lee?' – and to every paparazzi outside a restaurant who's still shouting at me, 'Bill, what about the Stan Lee thing?' Okay. Your day has come."

“Grownups these days they cling so desperately to their childhood that when they do act their age they have a special word for it now: Adulting," he said on his HBO show.

“You can, if you want, like the exact same things you liked when you were 10, but if you do, you need to grow up," Maher continued. “That was the point of my blog. I'm not glad Stan Lee is dead, I'm sad you're alive."

However, fiction writer Catherynne Valente wasn't having it, so she wrote a viral twitter thread defending her generation.

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Many Twitter enthusiasts agreed!

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Every generation judges the generations that come after, and Millennials have been taking it on the chin lately.

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