Why the Market Can't Give Us Quality News Why the Market Can't Give Us Quality News
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Why the Market Can't Give Us Quality News

by Andrew Price

January 23, 2010
Because we don't want it. Miller-McCune reports on a new study by some media researchers at USC that looked at the "viewing habits, cultural, political and cognitive dispositions" of people in six different countries. Their findings:
(1) viewers worldwide turn to particular broadcasters to affirmrather than inform their opinions, meaning the global news mediaare likely to reinforce existing attitudes and stereotypes ofcultural ‘others'; and (2) the longer viewers havebeen watching Al-Jazeera English, the less dogmatic they arein their thinking and thus more open to considering alternativeand clashing opinions.
There are endless studies showing how slanted, infotainment news in the style of Fox doesn't do much to really inform people. But with The New York Times moving to a "metered model," it merits mentioning the further point that if we just let the market decide which media outlets survive we will likely end up with less informed, more dogmatic voters because people don't choose informing news.
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Why the Market Can't Give Us Quality News