GOOD
via Reddit

When parents choose not to vaccinate their children, they are taking what they believe to be calculated risk: to protect my child from a vaccination injury, such as autism, I will put them at risk of developing a host of diseases, including measles, tetanus, mumps, polio, hepatitis B, and diphtheria.

They also choose to put others, especially babies that are too young to be immunized, at risk of life-threatening illnesses.

This reasoning is incredibly selfish given the fact that there is absolutely no evidence that vaccinations cause autism.

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via Pixabay

The final episode of "The Sopranos" made a lot of people angry because it ends with mob boss Tony Soprano and his family eating at an ice cream parlor while "Don't Stop Believin'" by Journey plays in the background … and then, suddenly, the screen turns black.

Some thought the ending was a dirty trick, while others saw it as a stroke of brilliance. A popular theory is that Tony gets shot, but doesn't know it because, as his brother-in-law Bobby Baccala said, "You probably don't even hear it when it happens, right?"

So the show gives us all an idea of what it's like to die. We're here and then we're not.

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Photo courtesy Cybersmile.

Chessie King is no stranger to harsh criticism about her appearance.

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Image via Jordan Mansfield / Getty Images.

Ask any man over 30 about the stupidest things he did in his late teens and early 20s and he’s bound to blush. During those years, men are hopped up on testosterone, making them more competitive and prone to risk-taking behaviors.

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Photo by DVIDShub/Flickr

For those in the military, sleep can mean the difference between life and death. But shut-eye can be very hard to come by, especially during active conflict.

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Avoiding the sun could negatively affect women’s health

A study finds that avoiding sun exposure poses a health risk.

“Women with active sunlight exposure habits experience a lower mortality rate than women who avoid sun exposure,” concludes a study published March 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine. It’s a surprisingly counterintuitive conclusion in our “cover-up” culture, but it turns out regular sun exposure is not only good for you, it’s a major factor to health and longevity.

The authors of the study, led by Pelle Lindqvist, MD, of Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Sweden, studied nearly 30,000 Swedish women over 20 years. Compared to those who avoided sun exposure, women with active sun exposure habits were mainly at a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-cancer/non-CVD death.

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