GOOD

Good Books: Andrew Kuo's What Me Worry

In his endearingly nerdy and often compulsive works, artist Andrew Kuo makes a brilliant career of sweating the small stuff.


Can the stuff that keeps you awake at night—bedbugs, loneliness, the New York Knicks—morph into something beautiful? It sure can in the capable hands (and quirky brain) of Andrew Kuo, an artist who renders the mundane into gorgeous, color-saturated infographics, messy/cute paintings, and simple sculptures that minimalist Donald Judd might have fashioned had he been into bright colors, Top Chef, and Dinosaur, Jr. They're all collected in a new monograph, What Me Worry.


Kuo's musings are undeserving of the glorious graphic treatment they receive and that's kind of the point. To wit, the beautiful "My Ideal Slacker Tuesday on March 27, 2008" lists such bold undertakings as sleeping, checking "amusing emails," and eating "Chinese food with no less than three people and no more than four. No one complains or pays more than $12."

Another piece called "See Ya Later! And/Or Ways to Check Out on March 21, 2009" offers a sort of Top 10 list of ways to say sayonora: "Stroking out after a six-course Chinese food dinner prepared by Julia Child" or "Falling off the stage at MSG while performing emotional minimal techno." Then there's "Drinking as of August 24, 2006 (Tears Running Face)" which color-correlates the relative benefits of Vitamin Water after a night of tequila.


Kuo is an endearingly pathetic art and music nerd, long on time, short on female companionship. Lucky us that he transforms all that heartbreak, post-night out headaches, and anxiety into visual awesomeness.
Articles
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

The phrase "stay in your lane" is usually lobbed at celebrities who talk about politics on Twitter by people who disagree with them. People in the sports world will often get a "stick to sports" when they try to have an opinion that lies outside of the field of play.

Keep Reading
Culture

The Free the Nipple movement is trying to remove the stigma on women's breasts by making it culturally acceptable and legal for women to go topless in public. But it turns out, Free the Nipple might be fighting on the wrong front and should be focusing on freeing the nipple in a place you'd never expect. Your own home.

A woman in Utah is facing criminal charges for not wearing a shirt in her house, with prosecutors arguing that women's chests are culturally considered lewd.

Keep Reading

In August, the Recording Academy hired their first female CEO, Deborah Dugan. Ten days before the Grammys, Dugan was placed on administrative leave for misconduct allegations after a female employee said Dugan was "abusive" and created a "toxic and intolerable" work environment. However, Dugan says she was actually removed from her position for complaining to human resources about sexual harassment, pay disparities, and conflicts of interest in the award show's nomination process.

Just five days before the Grammys, Dugan filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and her claims are many. Dugan says she was paid less than former CEO Neil Portnow. In 2018, Portnow received criticism for saying women need to "step up" when only two female acts won Grammys. Portnow decided to not renew his contract shortly after. Dugan says she was also asked to hire Portnow as a consultant for $750,000 a year, which she refused to do.

Keep Reading