GOOD

GOOD for America: Car-Free Streets

Our CEO heads to the Dylan Ratigan Show to talk about car-free streets and the business benefits.

GOOD CEO Ben Goldhirsh is a regular guest on The Dylan Ratigan Show on MSNBC for a segment called "GOOD for America." We'll be collecting clips of his appearances here.

Two years ago, Mayor Michael Bloomberg closed down Manhattan's Times Square to cars. The idea was to give the street back to pedestrians, increase mobility along that notoriously clustered stretch of Broadway, improve the experience for visitors and local workers, and hopefully, improve air quality. Today, it's pretty hard to find any critics of the change.


Yesterday, our CEO Ben Goldhirsh was joined by Tim Tompkins from the Times Square Alliance on The Dylan Ratigan Show to talk about the benefits—ones that were expected and pleasant surprises—of closing Broadway down to cars.

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Ratigan admits that he was skeptical when he first heard of the idea, but that he's a convert. Goldhirsh, ever the businessman, talks at length about the real benefits to local retailers along the pedestrian way. We want to know: What city is next?

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