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Stephen Hawking Issues One Perfect Sentence On Donald Trump And His Supporters

One of the smartest people on the planet tries to explain the unexplainable.

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Now that there's nothing 'presumptive’ about Donald J. Trump becoming the Republican nominee for president, some people are getting more uncomfortable with the increasingly realistic chance that the real estate mogul could actually make it to the Oval Office. Traditional conservatives are becoming more vocal about the candidate, as seen in public denouncements of Trump’s policies, actions, and speeches. Take, for example, New York Times’ right-leaning writer David Brooks’ recent article entitled “The Dark Night,” an essay about how the recent fear-mongering ploys by the Republican nominee "takes the pervasive collection of anxieties that plague America and it concentrates them on the most visceral one: fear of violence and crime.”


So how do you explain Trump’s continued popularity? Perhaps the physicist can shed some light on the situation?

“I can’t,” Stephen Hawking said, after being asked in a interview with CNN affiliate ITV to explain Trump’s unprecedented political ascension.

For someone who has the ability to explain the unexplainable, this observation is a bit disappointing. However, the (arguably) smartest person on Earth did go on to offer his personal take on the man:

“He is a demagogue, who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator.”

Trump has yet to comment, but don't be surprised if there’s a tweet storm a’ brewin’.

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