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Police High-Fiving Women’s March Protesters Is Just Awesome

“The appreciation and love is unbelievable!”

As women around the world marched this past weekend, one thing you didn’t hear much about were confrontations with law enforcement. By and large, the protests were a peaceful demonstration in favor of women’s rights and a denunciation of the actions and policies put forth by President Donald Trump.

But police in Atlanta went one step beyond the mantra of “to protect and serve” by offering some encouraging high-fives to female protesters who moved in file past the police barricade on their way to the local demonstration, one of hundreds around the globe.


Groups of women repeatedly say, “thank you” with several officers simply replying, “no problem,” as the demonstrators move along their way in happy unison. The simple but powerful gesture was a nice anecdote to a weekend full of mixed emotions as millions gathered in solidarity against a grim new political reality.

The City of Atlanta Police Department posted video of the moment to their Facebook page, where it’s already been viewed nearly 6 million times.

In a note with the video, the department pretty much summed up all of the good feelings simply by stating, “The appreciation and love is unbelievable! Thank you ATLANTA!”

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