GOOD

Shrimp Is Not Just For Seafood Lovers

Go beyond shrimp cocktail for your next party.

Looking for an affordable option to throw a casual get-together? An easy and quicker way to throw a dinner party? Impress your friends and serve these shrimp recipes as appetizers and your guests will never ask when the main course is being served again.

Whole Foods Market's seafood buyers visit shrimp farms across the country and around the world to find producers that meet their strict standards for responsible aquaculture. They track their farm-raised shrimp from pond to store to make sure it comes from approved farms. Fresh or flash-frozen within hours of harvest, you can count on delicious, sweet and tender shrimp without preservatives.


Cut down on prep time and just worry about keeping your tail-on and partying!

These broiled shrimp toasts with greens make impressive hors d'oeuvres that your guests can pass around while you finish up in the kitchen.

Ingredients:

3/4 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
4 green onions, light green and white parts, chopped
1/8 teaspoon coarse sea salt, divided
12 slices (about 12 ounces) sprouted whole grain bread
1 1/2 tablespoons sesame seeds
8 cups lightly packed mixed greens (about 4 ounces)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Method:
1. In a food processor, combine shrimp, mustard, green onions and 1 pinch salt, and pulse until you have a paste. Preheat the broiler. Place bread on a sheet pan and broil just until lightly toasted on one side, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the broiler, turn slices over, and spread untoasted sides with about 2 tablespoons shrimp mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Broil 6 to 7 inches from heat until shrimp is cooked through and browned, 2 to 3 minutes.
2. In a large bowl, toss greens with lemon juice, pepper and remaining salt and serve with the toasts.

This Thai-inspired shrimp salad is refreshing as a starter. Marinate the shallots in the dressing to make a quick pickle before tossing in the rest of the ingredients.

Ingredients:

8 ounces uncooked brown rice noodles
1/4 cup lime juice
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1/8 teaspoon crushed red chile pepper
1/2 pound cooked, peeled and deveined medium shrimp with tails removed
3 cups shredded carrots
1/2 cup dry-roasted unsalted peanuts
1/2 cup sliced shallots
1/3 cup chopped fresh mint

Method:

1. Cook noodles according to package directions. Rinse until cool, then drain and place in a large bowl. In a separate large bowl, combine lime juice, vinegar and crushed red pepper to make a dressing. Toss noodles with 2 tablespoons of dressing. Toss remaining dressing with shrimp, carrots, peanuts, shallots and mint. Serve shrimp mixture over rice noodles.

For your soup course, this curry and coconut-based shrimp soup will make a splash with a seasonal vegetable superstar, butternut squash.

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons expeller-pressed canola oil
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
1 teaspoon red curry paste, more to taste
2 teaspoons light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 medium butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces, about 4 cups
2 cups low-sodium gluten-free chicken broth
1 (14-ounce) can coconut milk
1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup shredded coconut, toasted (optional)
Lime wedges

Method:
1. Heat oil in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic and ginger. Cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant and onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in curry paste, sugar and salt and cook 1 minute longer. Stir in squash, broth and coconut milk and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until squash is tender, 20 to 25 minutes.
2. Stir in shrimp and simmer just until cooked through, about 2 minutes. Stir in cilantro, sprinkle with coconut and serve with lime wedges on the side.

Go to wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes to find more delicious recipes. And don't forget to visit wholefoodsmarket.com/sales or download the app to enjoy great savings on responsibly-farmed cooked shrimp and other high-quality ingredients!

Articles
Julian Meehan

Young leaders from around the world are gathering at the United Nations Headquarters in New York Saturday to address arguably the most urgent issue of our time. The Youth Climate Summit comes on the heels of an international strike spearheaded by Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate activist from Sweden, who arrived in New York via emissions-free sailboat earlier this month.

Translated from Swedish, "berg" means "mountain," so it may feel fated that a young woman with Viking blood in her veins and summit in her name would be at the helm. But let's go out on a limb and presume Thunberg, in keeping with most activists, would chafe at the notion of pre-ordained "destiny," and rightly so. Destiny is passive — it happens to you. It's also egomaniacal. Change, on the other hand, is active; you have to fight. And it is humble. "We need to get angry and understand what is at stake," Thunberg declared. "And then we need to transform that anger into action."

This new generation of activists' most pernicious enemy is denial. The people in charge — complacent politicians and corporation heads who grossly benefit from maintaining the status quo — are buffered from real-life consequences of climate change. But millions of people don't share that privilege. For them, climate change isn't an abstract concept, but a daily state of emergency, whether it comes in the form of "prolonged drought in sub-Saharan Africa…devastating tropical storms sweeping across Southeast Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific…[or] heatwaves and wildfires," as Amnesty International reportsare all too real problems people are facing on a regular basis.

RELATED: Greta Thunberg urges people to turn to nature to combat climate change

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet

Millions of people in over 150 countries across the globe marched for lawmakers and corporations to take action to help stop climate change on Friday, September 20.

The Climate Strikes were organized by children around the world as an extension of the of the "Fridays for Future" campaign. Students have been walking out of classrooms on Fridays to speak out about political inaction surrounding the climate crisis.

"We need to act right now to stop burning fossil fuels and ensure a rapid energy revolution with equity, reparations and climate justice at its heart," organizers say.

There's no doubt the visual images from the marches send a powerful message to those on the ground but especially those watching from around the world. GOOD's own Gabriel Reilich was on the scene for the largest of the Climate Strikes. Here are 18 of the best signs from the Climate Strike march in New York City.

Keep Reading Show less

September 20th marks the beginning of a pivotal push for the future of our planet. The Global Climate Strike will set the stage for the United Nations Climate Action Summit, where more than 60 nations are expected to build upon their commitment to 2015's Paris Agreement for combating climate change.

Millions of people are expected to take part in an estimated 4,000 events across 130 countries.

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet
via Apple

When the iPhone 11 debuted on September 10, it was met with less enthusiasm than the usual iPhone release. A lot of techies are holding off purchasing the latest gadget until Apple releases a phone with 5G technology.

Major US phone carriers have yet to build out the infrastructure necessary to provide a consistent 5G experience, so Apple didn't feel it necessary to integrate the technology into its latest iPhone.

A dramatic new feature on the iPhone 11 Pro is its three camera lenses. The three lenses give users the the original wide, plus ultrawide and telephoto options.

Keep Reading Show less
Health
via I love butter / Flickr

We often dismiss our dreams as nonsensical dispatches from the mind while we're deep asleep. But recent research proves that our dreams can definitely affect our waking lives.

People often dream about their significant others and studies show it actually affects how we behave towads them the next day.

"A lot of people don't pay attention to their dreams and are unaware of the impact they have on their state of mind," said Dylan Selterman, psychology lecturer at the University of Maryland, says according to The Huffington Post. "Now we have evidence that there is this association."

Keep Reading Show less
Health