GOOD

Tune in for a Malaria Q&A with Clooney and Kristof

Both malaria survivors, the duo is answering questions about what it's like to have the disease to give people some context.


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New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof and George Clooney traveled to Africa together last year to report on independence in Southern Sudan. And while civil war did not break out there, malaria did. Both Kristof and his travel buddy have bonded over their respective cases of malaria and Kristof uses his op-ed column to bring attention to the disease:

Malaria, which kills about 850,000 people every year (about one every 38 seconds) is still so widespread and lethal partly because it never gets adequate attention — so this seems a chance to try to remedy that. So with your help, we’re going to do both right now. Send in your questions for George and me about malaria, either about his case in particular or about the problem in general — or about why it is that so many still die in places like Sudan of a disease that we know how to eradicate. We’ll go through your questions, and George and I will answer the best and try to shine a light on the problem. And that mosquito that bit George will realize that it took a bite out of the wrong guy.

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Even if you're not a fan of Clooney, this video of their trip to Chad is pretty amusing:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agLP0hTUC9k

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