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In order to celebrate the New York Public Library's 125th anniversary, the library announced a list of the top 10 most checked out books in the library's history. The list, which took six months to compile, was determined by a team of experts who looked at the "historic checkout and circulation data" for all formats of the book. Ezra Jack Keats's "The Snow Day" tops the list, having been checked out 485,583 times through June 2019. While many children's books topped the top 10 list, the number one choice is significant because the main character of the story is black. "It's even more amazing that the top-ranked book is a book that has that element of diversity," New York Public Library President Anthony W. Marx said.

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via Taku Inoue / Twitter

"Tom and Jerry" animated shorts follow the countless attempts of a cat named Tom to capture his friend Jerry, a mouse.

The two have genuine affection for each other although they are constantly ensnared into a literal game of cat-and-mouse where Jerry almost always wins and Tom winds up getting pulverized.

The show is either a monument to Tom's perseverance to catch the mouse or his stupidity because he never achieves his goal.

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At this past weekend's North American International Toy Fair in New York, not every participant was a toymaker. In the back of the huge space was a booth for BuddyTag—a smart wristband that helps parents monitor children within 120 feet. BuddyTag was invented by Willie Wu after he lost his daughter at Six Flags. “His child did everything right—waiting in one place with an employee of the park," said Wu's sister, who was stationed at the booth. The kid was found in an hour, “but it was the worst hour of his life." It also sparked an idea.

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Image courtesy of GPlates.org

If you want to see the Earth move, check out GPlates.org—the new and massively detailed suite of virtual globes and interactive maps that visualize how Earth and its continents evolved geologically. Developed by an international team led by University of Sydney researchers, the site offers interactive exploration of supercontinents, including the breakup and dispersal of Pangaea—the supercontinent from which our current topography developed over the last 200 million years.

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