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Pakistani Comicbook Fights Violent Extremism, One Panel at a Time

15,000 copies of Paasban have been distributed to schools across Pakistan.

Image via the CFX Facebook page.

A Pakistani comic book studio based in Islamabad, CFX Comics, debuted a new series this week called Paasban, which aims to prevent teenagers from being drawn into the world of extemist violence and armed political organizations. The story, based on the life of one its creators, Gauher Aftab, follows a group of friends who are forced to cope with this issue directly when an extremist group attempts to court one of their friends. Aftab, along with his co-creators Mustafa Hasnain and Yahya Ehsan, are making the comic available in both English and Urdu, and distributed the first 15,000 copies to schools around Pakistan.

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Internet Goes Wild After India Detains Pakistani Spy Pigeon

The clandestine bird has become a meme-ified star with his own mobile app game.

Narendra Modi is the prime minister of India.

Last week, Indian intelligence officials detained a pigeon they suspected of being a spy for the Pakistani government. According to the BBC, a 14-year-old boy spotted the bird, which had a message written on its feathers in the Urdu language. The bird had the misfortune of being found near Kashmir, territory over which both India and Pakistan claim ownership. Apparently, this is not the first time where police have had to take a pigeon into custody over suspicions of spying.

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Peshawar Police Arrest Anti-Vaxxer Parents

513 parents went to jail for refusing to vaccinate their children from the polio virus.

Screengrab from CNN video.

Polio continues to present a major threat to much of Pakistan’s population—the country was host to 327 cases of the virus in 2014, the most in the world (compare that to Nigeria which came in second with only 36 cases). Still, vaccinating children from the disease has proved to be an impossible task in Pakistan and the Peshawar police has decided to make into a police matter—this week, they arrested 513 parents who have yet to vaccinate their children.

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Girls' Education Activist Malala Yousufzai Is Still on a Mission

"Let's work together to educate girls around the world."

Back in October when 15-year-old girls' education activist Malala Yousufzai was shot in the head by the Taliban for speaking out against them, the world rallied to condemn the violence against her. Yousufzai's currently recovering in a U.K. hospital but she shared a message full of gratitude and a call to action with Anderson Cooper so he could share it at CNN's "Heroes" ceremony on Sunday night.

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People are awesome: Man Writes Letter to Daughter of Man He Killed

Almost 50 years after shooting down a plane in the Indo-Pakistani War, a pilot wrote a letter to his victim's daughter.


In 1965, during the very brief Indo-Pakistani War, rookie Pakistani pilot Qais Hussain shot down Indian air force pilot Jahangir "Jangoo" Engineer. Last week, nearly half a century after killing Engineer, Hussain, racked with guilt, wrote a letter to Engineer's daughter, Farid Singh. The letter describes in detail how Hussain had tried to avoid firing on Engineer, only to be ordered to take down the Indian's eight-seat transport plane. Only after Hussain followed orders did he discover the plane had been filled with civilians.

A news report from April described the now infamous attack, "The Gujurat Beechcraft Incident," reinvigorating the regret Hussain had felt for decades. "I did not play foul and went by the rules of business, but the unfortunate loss of precious lives, no matter how it happens, hurts each human and I am no exception," Hussain wrote. "I feel sorry for you, your family, and the other seven families who lost their dearest ones."

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Report: War Is a Really Terrible Learning Environment

A new UNESCO report says that 28 million kids don't go to school because of armed conflict in their countries.


A report out today from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (also known as UNESCO) has some depressing data on the number of children worldwide who don't go to school—more than 67 million across the globe. And, what's especially disturbing is that 28 million of them don't go because of armed conflict.

According to the report, classrooms, teachers, and students are increasingly seen as legitimate targets.

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