GOOD

Education: Morning Roundup, Has Teacher Accountability Gone Too Far?


\n
Morning Roundup:

From The New York Times: When Does Holding Teachers Accountable Go Too Far?

The start of the school year brings another one of those nagging, often unquenchable worries of parenthood: How good will my child’s teachers be?

\n

From the Los Angeles Times: Teachers comment on their value-added evaluations

Some of the 6,000 L.A. Unified teachers whose rankings were made public by The Times air their thoughts on value-added ratings.

\n

From the Los Angeles Times: L.A. civic leaders urge LAUSD, union to revamp teacher evaluations

The group, including the presidents of the L.A. Area Chamber of Commerce and United Way of Greater L.A., urges the use of student test score data and more access to information about instructors for families.

\n

From The New York Times: Scholastic Books Revamps Its Marketing

This school year, the bookseller is taking a new approach to getting its books into classrooms. For the first time, it plans to reach teachers using a combination of social networking, expanded e-commerce and new back-to-school promotions, in addition to the standard paper catalogs.

\n

From The Economist: Questions for Jose Ferreira

Jose Ferreira is the CEO and founder of Knewton, an online learning start-up which offers customised preparatory courses for standardised tests.

\n

Photo via.

Articles
via The Hill / Twitter

President Trump's appearance at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland was a mixed bag.

The theme of the event was climate change, but Trump chose to use his 30 minutes of speaking time to brag about the "spectacular" U.S. economy and encouraged world leaders to invest in America.

He didn't mention climate change once.

Keep Reading
The Planet
via David Leavitt / Twitter and RealTargetTori / Twitter

Last Friday, GOOD reported on an infuriating incident that went down at a Massachusetts Target.

A Target manager who's come to be known as "Target Tori," was harassed by Twitter troll David Leavitt for not selling him an $89 Oral-B Pro 5000 toothbrush for a penny.

He describes himself as a "multimedia journalist who has worked for CBS, AXS, Yahoo, and others."

Keep Reading
Communities

The Australian bushfires have claimed 27 human lives, an estimated 1 billion animals are feared dead, and thousands of properties have been completely decimated.

The fires were caused by extreme heat and dryness, the result of 2019 being the country's hottest year on record, with average temperatures 1.52C above the 1961-1990 average.

The area hit hardest by the fires, New South Wales, also had its hottest year on record, with temperatures rising 1.95C above average.

Keep Reading
The Planet