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Jimmy Kimmel Explains Trump To Kids With A Brilliant ‘Schoolhouse Rock!’ Parody

“I’m just a lie, yes, I’m only a lie”

Any kid who grew up in the ’70s and ’80s remembers the “Schoolhouse Rock!” series of short films and videos that ran during Saturday morning cartoons. The quick vignettes educated and entertained children in between cartoons and commercials for sugary cereals and Barbie dolls. One of the most popular segments was 1976’s “I’m Just A Bill,” which covered the story of a lonely bill on Capitol Hill on his perilous journey to becoming a law.


Now it’s 2017, and the Trump administration has changed the political landscape so “bigly,” children need to be educated on how to determine facts from alternative facts and down-right lies. So ABC late-night host Jimmy Kimmel created a new video called “I’m Just a Lie” to “bring children up to date on the new American way.”

Here’s the lyrics:

I’m just a lie
Yes, I’m only a lie
I'm so untrue I just want to cry

Well, I just popped out of the president’s brain
And the very idea of it’s completely insane
But someday I’m gonna be a fact

Oh yes, I’ll try and I’ll try
But today, I am still just a lie

I’m just a lie
Yes, I’m only a lie
But I’m gonna be a fact by and by

See, first the president tweets
And followers retweet me
They try to debunk me
All they do is repeat me

And across the internet, I’ll fly
That’s how I’ll spread far and wide
But today I am still just a lie

I’m just a lie
Just a sweet little lie
And I’m too believable to deny

Pretty soon I’m being debated, all over town
Kellyanne is spinning me, Spicer’s my clown
Everyone is taking sides, and the truth will lay down and die
Because you can’t tell a fact from a lie

Here’s the original “I’m Just A Bill”:

Articles
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

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