GOOD

Jane Goodall Makes A Simple Case For Encouraging Kids To Be Curious

The legendary primatologist tells Neil deGrasse Tyson how she fell in love with science. Spoiler alert: It was way before she headed to Africa to study chimpanzees.

Simply put, Jane Goodall is a legend. Her groundbreaking research on chimpanzees during her time at the Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania in the 1960s changed the way scientists viewed the primates forever. Though she hadn’t been formally trained, Goodall’s discovery – that chimps were highly intelligent beings, had complex social structures, and could make and use tools – was revolutionary at the time.

Goodall’s scientific career began long before she trekked into the East African nation’s rugged mountains to study great apes, however. Her “science story” stretches all the way back to her childhood, and Neil deGrasse Tyson gets the scoop during an upcoming episode of his late-night show “StarTalk.”


During the show, Goodall explains her love of animals and science began when she was just 4 years old and wanted to know how hens laid eggs. After crawling into her family’s hen house and observing for hours, which prompted her parents to call the police because they had no idea where she was, Goodall finally learned the secret behind the mystery – and she couldn’t wait to tell her mother all about it.

“Isn’t that the making of a little scientist?” she explains. “Curiosity, asking questions, not getting the right answer, deciding to find out for yourself, making a mistake and not giving up and learning patience. It was all there when I was 4 and a half.”

In addition to her inquisitiveness, Goodall also had parents who encouraged her explorations, something kids today still need. “A different kind of mother might have crushed that scientific curiosity, and maybe I wouldn’t have done what I’ve done,” she says.

Goodall joins “StarTalk” co-host Chuck Nice, biological anthropologist Jill Pruetz, and primatologist Natalia Reagan to discuss chimp behavior, animal and environmental ethics, and the evolutionary differences between chimpanzees and humans.

Education
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

The phrase "stay in your lane" is usually lobbed at celebrities who talk about politics on Twitter by people who disagree with them. People in the sports world will often get a "stick to sports" when they try to have an opinion that lies outside of the field of play.

Keep Reading
Culture

The Free the Nipple movement is trying to remove the stigma on women's breasts by making it culturally acceptable and legal for women to go topless in public. But it turns out, Free the Nipple might be fighting on the wrong front and should be focusing on freeing the nipple in a place you'd never expect. Your own home.

A woman in Utah is facing criminal charges for not wearing a shirt in her house, with prosecutors arguing that women's chests are culturally considered lewd.

Keep Reading

In August, the Recording Academy hired their first female CEO, Deborah Dugan. Ten days before the Grammys, Dugan was placed on administrative leave for misconduct allegations after a female employee said Dugan was "abusive" and created a "toxic and intolerable" work environment. However, Dugan says she was actually removed from her position for complaining to human resources about sexual harassment, pay disparities, and conflicts of interest in the award show's nomination process.

Just five days before the Grammys, Dugan filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and her claims are many. Dugan says she was paid less than former CEO Neil Portnow. In 2018, Portnow received criticism for saying women need to "step up" when only two female acts won Grammys. Portnow decided to not renew his contract shortly after. Dugan says she was also asked to hire Portnow as a consultant for $750,000 a year, which she refused to do.

Keep Reading