GOOD

After rumors of her death spread online, this distressingly-thin beauty blogger is finally getting help.

Three years ago, over 20,000 people signed a petition to have her bannded from YouTube.

.S / Flickr

Last year, GOOD published a story on Eugenia Cooney, the 24-year-old seriously underweight beauty blogger with over 1.5 million followers on YouTube.


Cooney denies that she has an eating disorder, but it’s nearly impossible to look at photos of her and think otherwise. Not only does it appear as though she is seriously unhealthy, but she also presents a dangerous example of “beauty” to her countless fans.

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Her situation was so distressing that in 2016, Lynn Cloud created a Change.org petition to have her banned from YouTube for being an unhealthy influence on young girls. Over 20,000 people signed the petition.

“She knows that she’s influencing young teenage girls into thinking being 60 lbs. is normal. It’s most definitely not,” she told Attn:. “Ever since she has moved out of her mother’s house recently, she has been getting skinnier and skinnier. This clearly isn’t a ‘high metabolism’ or any other type of losing body weight uncontrollably condition.”

Cooney addressed the controversy by dodging the issue. “Some people are saying I’m like a bad influence on girls. I just want you guys to know like I have seriously never have tried to be a bad influence on YouTube or to influence anyone badly, she said. “I would never want to do that. I have never told anyone to try to like lose weight or to try to like change the way they look or to look like me.”

Whether Cooney will admit it or not, her appearance has had a dangerous effect on many young people who idolize her as a “thinspiration.”

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After a brief break from social media in January led to rumors of her death, she returned with a post saying she was taking a “much-needed break from the negativity.”

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Two weeks later, she tweeted that she was is getting the help she desperately needs, saying she’s “taking a break from social media and voluntarily working with my doctor privately.”

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Her worried fans responded with an outpouring of love.

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Time will tell if Cooney is able to overcome her serious health issue. But by taking steps to acknowledge her problem and seeking help she’s setting a good example for her fans. Hopefully, when she returns to YouTube, she’s healthy and can share the dangers of being excessively thin with her followers.

If you or someone you love is suffering from an eating disorder and looking for support, resources or treatment options, call the NEDA helpline at (800) 931-2237.

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