GOOD

GOOD Ideas for Cities Is Coming to Richmond and Cincinnati

We're looking for creatives in Richmond and Cincinnati to apply to present solutions for local challenges.

After a fantastic event in Portland, Oregon, and another event coming up in St. Louis, we're thrilled to announce the next GOOD Ideas for Cities events in Richmond, Virginia and Cincinnati, Ohio.


GOOD Ideas for Cities taps creative problem-solvers to tackle real urban challenges proposed by civic leaders and present their solutions at live events across the country. Thanks to our partnership with CEOs for Cities and a generous grant from ArtPlace, we're taking the program to five mid-sized cities in 2012. In Richmond, individuals can apply and will be placed on one of three teams. In Cincinnati, groups of any size can apply as a creative team, and six teams will be selected to participate.

Richmond, Virginia
Tuesday, April 24 at The Valentine Richmond History Center
Hosted by The i.e.* Initiative of the Greater Richmond Chamber and Capital Region Collaborative

See the event details, challenges, and RSVP information here.

Education and Economy
April Johnson, Lisa Taranto, Sarah Milston, Peter Fraser, Camden Whitehead, Mimi Sadler, Dean Browell, Emily Griffey, Dominic Barrett, Emma Terray Spivack, Peyton Rowe, Trina Lambert, R. Vincent Alfaro, Rachel Kopelovich Douglas, Shannon Williams, Elizabeth Hailand, Stephen Curtis Clark, Sara Dunnigan

Culture and Tourism\n
Heide Trepanier, Collin Brady, John Sarvay, Stephen Robertson, Charles Collie, Casey Quinlan, Elizabeth Cogar, Ryn Bruce, Ross Catrow, Johnny Hugel, Tony Scida, Meredith Salley, Ali Croft, Christine Pizzo, Emily Smith, David McIntosh, Carter Graham Holt, Alana Kucharski, Ansel Olson, Jon Baliles
Business and Development
Larkin Garbee, Andrea Goulet, Amy Broderick, Holly Pearce, Jake Mitchell, Jeff MacDonald, Kendall Morris, Scott Ukrop, K. Giles Harnsberger, Evan MacKenzie, Sarah Keane, Ronald Rogers, Allen Chamberlain, Caitlin Kilcoin, Christie Thompson, Maureen Neal, Corey Lane, Emily Smith, Maritza Mercado
\n

Congratulations to the Cincinnati creative teams!

20-Somethings Doing Something: Michelle Stawicki, Lauren Mae Oswald, Angela Kowalski, Kelsey Downs, Mandy Smedley, Emily Wolf

Mission Possible: John Rizzo, Ben Patrick, Chris Simmons, Kelsey Hawke, Meghann Craig, Jon Cramer, Sarah Strassel, Missy Raterman

Cincinatives with GOOD Ideas: Dustin Blankenship, Julie Blum, Doug Hovekamp, Kara Koch

Scout Camp: Luke Field, Tina Sevilla Stear, Michael Bergman, Nick Dewald, Lindsay Dewald, Lann Brumlik Field, Eric Stear, Will Yokel

Hyperquake: Kate Kovalcin, LeAnne Wagner, A.J. Mercer, Dan Barczak, Matt Cole, Molly Danks, Chris Wallen

Design Impact and Kaleidoscope: Ramsey Ford, Kate Hanisian, Demetrius Romanos, Giacomo Ciminello

Event details, urban leaders, challenges and RSVP information will be posted soon.

For examples of how this works, see our videos of the Portland event, watch a video of an event in San Francisco, view a growing list of all ideas presented since 2008, or read recaps of the events from the last three years.

We hope to see you at an upcoming GOOD Ideas for Cities event! If you want to bring the program to your city or have any questions about applying, email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com or follow us at @IdeasforCities

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