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GOOD Maker Challenge: Win $10,000 for Your Company's Sustainability Efforts

This post is brought to you by GOOD, with support from UPS. We’ve teamed up to bring you the Small Business Collaborative, a series sharing stories about innovative small businesses that are changing business as usual for their communities and beyond. Learn how UPS is helping small businesses work better and more sustainably here.


In our fast-moving world, it’s more important than ever for businesses to be savvy about responsible long term growth and sound sustainable practices for both profit and the planet. But it’s difficult to know where to start.

GOOD and UPS are excited to announce the second Green Side of Business challenge, inviting companies to share how they would like to become more eco-friendly. Whether you’re a company’s owner or employee, enter your business now to win advice from green business experts and $10,000 to invest in its long term sustainability efforts.

Through this program, we hope to start a dialogue about smarter steps a business can take to help align smart business practices with sustainability principles. Whether it’s diversifying supply chains or creating a weekly carpool program, sustainability experts will offer ideas and advice about where a business can start.

Submit your company for the Green Side of Business challenge between now and October 26, noon Pacific Time, and your business will have a chance to navigate the growing sustainability business sector with advice from experts—and $10,000. A panel of judges will select one company as the winner based on its potential and commitment to improving sustainability growth. The business will also win a feature on GOOD to inspire other companies through its successes and challenges.

See here for official rules.

Want to learn more about GOOD Maker? Drop us a line at maker@goodinc.com, sign up for our email list, or check out past and current funding opportunities.

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via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

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