GOOD

Yes, Even You Can Make This Pussy Hat For The March On Washington

A pussy hat tutorial for the crafting challenged

By now, you’ve probably heard that as many as 200,000 people will join the Women’s March on Washington come January 21 with the goal of defending women’s rights—otherwise known as human rights. To help make the visual statement of thousands of people marching in unison all the more striking, Los Angeles-based creatives Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman teamed up to start the Pussyhat Project, a movement to get a pink “pussy hat” on every marcher’s head. With a sea of pink heading toward the National Mall this Saturday, Suh and Zweiman hope to create a lasting image and provide a way for participants to fortify a sense of solidarity long after the march has ended. Whether you knit a hat for yourself or make one to send to a marcher in D.C., there are a number of ways to get involved with this virtual knitting circle turned political movement.


As the founders and participants can attest, the Pussyhat Project aims to do much more than keep ears warm. At its most basic level, knitters find the process to be uniquely relaxing—even hypnotic. This aspect of the project becomes particularly relevant as the cultural climate wavers between uncertainty and stress. Zweiman wholeheartedly affirms this point, saying,

“It can be an individual respite. Knitting is scientifically shown to be akin to meditation. It is important that when times seem difficult, to take a step back and take care of oneself. This calming respite allows us to gather our thoughts and responses and ground ourselves. It is quiet contemplation.”

Women have traditionally carried the torch of caretaking and attending to the needs of others. Unsurprisingly, patriarchal capitalism systematically devalues this skill (example, women performing hours of unpaid work ), depicting the ability to nurture as “soft” or “weak” because it so rarely results in financial gain. Making hats and making them pink is a way of claiming ownership of these feminine traits and recognizing them as sources of strength and power. The only thing more threatening to an oppressive regime than embracing the activities we enjoy is using those common interests to connect with and empower like-minded others.

Pattern via Pussyhat Project & Celia Spink

But don’t let knitting’s radical possibilities scare you off. Zweiman promises even the most novice knitters can learn to make a pussyhat. “If you are knit-curious, this is a great first project,” she says, primarily because there are no complicated curves or knots to follow. The Pussyhat Project’s website features scores of patterns, and if you’re more of an audio-visual learner, look no further than this YouTube tutorial. Sure, manipulating yarn into a wearable accessory probably sounds like witchcraft for the uninitiated, but—spoiler alert—you cast on an 11-inch-wide base, knit until it’s 17 inches long, fold it in half, and stitch the sides. That’s it. You can simplify this process further, Zweiman explains, by remembering “the chunkier the yarn, the fewer stitches, the faster the process.”

Still, if your brain just exploded at the mention of casting and counting, have no fear. Those who are knitting-challenged (like myself, for instance) have the option of sewing a hat as well. A 15-year-old girl named Celia Spink designed an adorable pattern that even truly talentless drunk people can follow. Check out the video below to learn how to make yourself a hat in the time it takes to ironically watch The Bachelor.

Articles
Julian Meehan

Young leaders from around the world are gathering at the United Nations Headquarters in New York Saturday to address arguably the most urgent issue of our time. The Youth Climate Summit comes on the heels of an international strike spearheaded by Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate activist from Sweden, who arrived in New York via emissions-free sailboat earlier this month.

Translated from Swedish, "berg" means "mountain," so it may feel fated that a young woman with Viking blood in her veins and summit in her name would be at the helm. But let's go out on a limb and presume Thunberg, in keeping with most activists, would chafe at the notion of pre-ordained "destiny," and rightly so. Destiny is passive — it happens to you. It's also egomaniacal. Change, on the other hand, is active; you have to fight. And it is humble. "We need to get angry and understand what is at stake," Thunberg declared. "And then we need to transform that anger into action."

This new generation of activists' most pernicious enemy is denial. The people in charge — complacent politicians and corporation heads who grossly benefit from maintaining the status quo — are buffered from real-life consequences of climate change. But millions of people don't share that privilege. For them, climate change isn't an abstract concept, but a daily state of emergency, whether it comes in the form of "prolonged drought in sub-Saharan Africa…devastating tropical storms sweeping across Southeast Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific…[or] heatwaves and wildfires," as Amnesty International reportsare all too real problems people are facing on a regular basis.

RELATED: Greta Thunberg urges people to turn to nature to combat climate change

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet

Millions of people in over 150 countries across the globe marched for lawmakers and corporations to take action to help stop climate change on Friday, September 20.

The Climate Strikes were organized by children around the world as an extension of the of the "Fridays for Future" campaign. Students have been walking out of classrooms on Fridays to speak out about political inaction surrounding the climate crisis.

"We need to act right now to stop burning fossil fuels and ensure a rapid energy revolution with equity, reparations and climate justice at its heart," organizers say.

There's no doubt the visual images from the marches send a powerful message to those on the ground but especially those watching from around the world. GOOD's own Gabriel Reilich was on the scene for the largest of the Climate Strikes. Here are 18 of the best signs from the Climate Strike march in New York City.

Keep Reading Show less

September 20th marks the beginning of a pivotal push for the future of our planet. The Global Climate Strike will set the stage for the United Nations Climate Action Summit, where more than 60 nations are expected to build upon their commitment to 2015's Paris Agreement for combating climate change.

Millions of people are expected to take part in an estimated 4,000 events across 130 countries.

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet
via Apple

When the iPhone 11 debuted on September 10, it was met with less enthusiasm than the usual iPhone release. A lot of techies are holding off purchasing the latest gadget until Apple releases a phone with 5G technology.

Major US phone carriers have yet to build out the infrastructure necessary to provide a consistent 5G experience, so Apple didn't feel it necessary to integrate the technology into its latest iPhone.

A dramatic new feature on the iPhone 11 Pro is its three camera lenses. The three lenses give users the the original wide, plus ultrawide and telephoto options.

Keep Reading Show less
Health
via I love butter / Flickr

We often dismiss our dreams as nonsensical dispatches from the mind while we're deep asleep. But recent research proves that our dreams can definitely affect our waking lives.

People often dream about their significant others and studies show it actually affects how we behave towads them the next day.

"A lot of people don't pay attention to their dreams and are unaware of the impact they have on their state of mind," said Dylan Selterman, psychology lecturer at the University of Maryland, says according to The Huffington Post. "Now we have evidence that there is this association."

Keep Reading Show less
Health